Holland Landing

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Holland Landing

54 Archival description results for Holland Landing

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Discharge Pumps

Photo was taken near the Bradford Pump House at the junction of the canal and the Holland River near Hwy. 11. The pumps were flown in from Western Canada by the Armed Forces, arranged by Mr. Stoddart. A tractor was used to run the pump. Water was pumped from the flooded land over the dyke and into the canal from where it flowed along the Holland River and into Cook's Bay.

Rob Watson

Collier, William birth

February 10, 1988
Birth

Holland Landing couple are proud parents of test tube quintuplets
Holland Landing will soon be home to Canada's first-ever test tube quintuplets, born early Saturday morning at a Toronto hospital. Remington, Lance, Wade, William and Maxine were delivered two months premature over a five-minute span that began at 3:59 a.m. Saturday morning to Wayne and May Collier, of Dutch Settlers Crescent in Holland Landing. While they're not the first quintuplets born in Canada they are the first to be conceived by way of the in vitro fertilization process, and theirs was also the largest multiple birth ever at Women's College Hospital in Toronto, according to the public relations officer there. Wendy Lewis said Sunday afternoon that the five babies were listed in stable condition and that doctors were pleased with their progress. The babies will remain on respirators and under close observation for at least another couple of months, she said. Ms. Lewis said that a team of 25 doctors and nurses were involved in the birth, which took place with relative ease, with children arriving about a minute apart. They ranged in size at birth from 805 grams (one pound, 12 ounces) to nearly 1,200 grams (Two pounds, 10 ounces). The public relations officer said that Mrs. Collier, a 33-year-old executive administrative assistant with a law firm, had gone through a carefully monitored fertilization and gestation process under the Toronto East General LIF (Laboratory Initiated Foetal Emplacement) program. She had been in hospital for two months prior to the birth, and anticipated the number of children and their premature arrival. "She actually knew after five weeks of pregnancy she was going to have quintuplets, " Ms. Lewis explained, adding that premature labor "is expected in multiple births." Om fact Mrs. May had gone into labor twice during the week before the actual birth, she said. It will be at least 11 weeks before the quintuplets can come home to father Wayne, 27, an air conditioning and heating apprentice. The couple have no other children. Mrs. Collier couldn't be reached by phone over the weekend, but was slated to appear at a press conference in Toronto sometime Monday.

Bradford Weekly

Collier, Remington birth

February 10, 1988
Birth

Holland Landing couple are proud parents of test tube quintuplets
Holland Landing will soon be home to Canada's first-ever test tube quintuplets, born early Saturday morning at a Toronto hospital. Remington, Lance, Wade, William and Maxine were delivered two months premature over a five-minute span that began at 3:59 a.m. Saturday morning to Wayne and May Collier, of Dutch Settlers Crescent in Holland Landing. While they're not the first quintuplets born in Canada they are the first to be conceived by way of the in vitro fertilization process, and theirs was also the largest multiple birth ever at Women's College Hospital in Toronto, according to the public relations officer there. Wendy Lewis said Sunday afternoon that the five babies were listed in stable condition and that doctors were pleased with their progress. The babies will remain on respirators and under close observation for at least another couple of months, she said. Ms. Lewis said that a team of 25 doctors and nurses were involved in the birth, which took place with relative ease, with children arriving about a minute apart. They ranged in size at birth from 805 grams (one pound, 12 ounces) to nearly 1,200 grams (Two pounds, 10 ounces). The public relations officer said that Mrs. Collier, a 33-year-old executive administrative assistant with a law firm, had gone through a carefully monitored fertilization and gestation process under the Toronto East General LIF (Laboratory Initiated Foetal Emplacement) program. She had been in hospital for two months prior to the birth, and anticipated the number of children and their premature arrival. "She actually knew after five weeks of pregnancy she was going to have quintuplets, " Ms. Lewis explained, adding that premature labor "is expected in multiple births." Om fact Mrs. May had gone into labor twice during the week before the actual birth, she said. It will be at least 11 weeks before the quintuplets can come home to father Wayne, 27, an air conditioning and heating apprentice. The couple have no other children. Mrs. Collier couldn't be reached by phone over the weekend, but was slated to appear at a press conference in Toronto sometime Monday.

Bradford Weekly

Collier, Wade birth

February 10, 1988
Birth

Holland Landing couple are proud parents of test tube quintuplets
Holland Landing will soon be home to Canada's first-ever test tube quintuplets, born early Saturday morning at a Toronto hospital. Remington, Lance, Wade, William and Maxine were delivered two months premature over a five-minute span that began at 3:59 a.m. Saturday morning to Wayne and May Collier, of Dutch Settlers Crescent in Holland Landing. While they're not the first quintuplets born in Canada they are the first to be conceived by way of the in vitro fertilization process, and theirs was also the largest multiple birth ever at Women's College Hospital in Toronto, according to the public relations officer there. Wendy Lewis said Sunday afternoon that the five babies were listed in stable condition and that doctors were pleased with their progress. The babies will remain on respirators and under close observation for at least another couple of months, she said. Ms. Lewis said that a team of 25 doctors and nurses were involved in the birth, which took place with relative ease, with children arriving about a minute apart. They ranged in size at birth from 805 grams (one pound, 12 ounces) to nearly 1,200 grams (Two pounds, 10 ounces). The public relations officer said that Mrs. Collier, a 33-year-old executive administrative assistant with a law firm, had gone through a carefully monitored fertilization and gestation process under the Toronto East General LIF (Laboratory Initiated Foetal Emplacement) program. She had been in hospital for two months prior to the birth, and anticipated the number of children and their premature arrival. "She actually knew after five weeks of pregnancy she was going to have quintuplets, " Ms. Lewis explained, adding that premature labor "is expected in multiple births." Om fact Mrs. May had gone into labor twice during the week before the actual birth, she said. It will be at least 11 weeks before the quintuplets can come home to father Wayne, 27, an air conditioning and heating apprentice. The couple have no other children. Mrs. Collier couldn't be reached by phone over the weekend, but was slated to appear at a press conference in Toronto sometime Monday.

Bradford Weekly

Collier, Lance birth

February 10, 1988
Birth

Holland Landing couple are proud parents of test tube quintuplets
Holland Landing will soon be home to Canada's first-ever test tube quintuplets, born early Saturday morning at a Toronto hospital. Remington, Lance, Wade, William and Maxine were delivered two months premature over a five-minute span that began at 3:59 a.m. Saturday morning to Wayne and May Collier, of Dutch Settlers Crescent in Holland Landing. While they're not the first quintuplets born in Canada they are the first to be conceived by way of the in vitro fertilization process, and theirs was also the largest multiple birth ever at Women's College Hospital in Toronto, according to the public relations officer there. Wendy Lewis said Sunday afternoon that the five babies were listed in stable condition and that doctors were pleased with their progress. The babies will remain on respirators and under close observation for at least another couple of months, she said. Ms. Lewis said that a team of 25 doctors and nurses were involved in the birth, which took place with relative ease, with children arriving about a minute apart. They ranged in size at birth from 805 grams (one pound, 12 ounces) to nearly 1,200 grams (Two pounds, 10 ounces). The public relations officer said that Mrs. Collier, a 33-year-old executive administrative assistant with a law firm, had gone through a carefully monitored fertilization and gestation process under the Toronto East General LIF (Laboratory Initiated Foetal Emplacement) program. She had been in hospital for two months prior to the birth, and anticipated the number of children and their premature arrival. "She actually knew after five weeks of pregnancy she was going to have quintuplets, " Ms. Lewis explained, adding that premature labor "is expected in multiple births." Om fact Mrs. May had gone into labor twice during the week before the actual birth, she said. It will be at least 11 weeks before the quintuplets can come home to father Wayne, 27, an air conditioning and heating apprentice. The couple have no other children. Mrs. Collier couldn't be reached by phone over the weekend, but was slated to appear at a press conference in Toronto sometime Monday.

Bradford Weekly

Collier, Maxine birth

February 10, 1988
Birth

Holland Landing couple are proud parents of test tube quintuplets
Holland Landing will soon be home to Canada's first-ever test tube quintuplets, born early Saturday morning at a Toronto hospital. Remington, Lance, Wade, William and Maxine were delivered two months premature over a five-minute span that began at 3:59 a.m. Saturday morning to Wayne and May Collier, of Dutch Settlers Crescent in Holland Landing. While they're not the first quintuplets born in Canada they are the first to be conceived by way of the in vitro fertilization process, and theirs was also the largest multiple birth ever at Women's College Hospital in Toronto, according to the public relations officer there. Wendy Lewis said Sunday afternoon that the five babies were listed in stable condition and that doctors were pleased with their progress. The babies will remain on respirators and under close observation for at least another couple of months, she said. Ms. Lewis said that a team of 25 doctors and nurses were involved in the birth, which took place with relative ease, with children arriving about a minute apart. They ranged in size at birth from 805 grams (one pound, 12 ounces) to nearly 1,200 grams (Two pounds, 10 ounces). The public relations officer said that Mrs. Collier, a 33-year-old executive administrative assistant with a law firm, had gone through a carefully monitored fertilization and gestation process under the Toronto East General LIF (Laboratory Initiated Foetal Emplacement) program. She had been in hospital for two months prior to the birth, and anticipated the number of children and their premature arrival. "She actually knew after five weeks of pregnancy she was going to have quintuplets, " Ms. Lewis explained, adding that premature labor "is expected in multiple births." Om fact Mrs. May had gone into labor twice during the week before the actual birth, she said. It will be at least 11 weeks before the quintuplets can come home to father Wayne, 27, an air conditioning and heating apprentice. The couple have no other children. Mrs. Collier couldn't be reached by phone over the weekend, but was slated to appear at a press conference in Toronto sometime Monday.

Bradford Weekly

Hurricane Hazel remembered...

Description : The flooding of the Marsh on October 15th, 1954, is one occasion not easily forgotten by those who were part of the Springdale community at that time. It had already rained for weeks. We were behind in the harvesting, and most of the onions were still in the field, bagged up and stacked in long rows. On that Friday, October 15th the rain kept pouring down, and an all-time record of 7" of rain was recorded for the Toronto area. Hurricane Hazel had entered the mainland just south of Myrtle Beach, leaving a path of destruction and devastation with winds over 90 miles per hour, and torrential rains. It crossed Lake Ontario near Toronto. At 7:30 p.m. that Friday we received a phone call to leave for higher ground. Laying sandbags on the dikes had proven a hopeless task, as the water that came roaring down from the surrounding hills was just too much. We put some suitcases on the truck and left our house. For a few minutes, the rain stopped, the sky was clear above, and the stillness was eerie. Then it started again: the wind, the rain, the darkness. The roads were full of gullies. Weston Road, then the 6th Concession of King Twp., was under construction, and turned into a river of mud. The water in the canal was close to the top of the dike. I got out of the truck to check whether the bridge was still there. We followed the townline eastward. A 3' wide creek east of Highway 400 had turned into a raging river, boiling 2' high over the small bridge. About 10 cars were standing there, the drivers debating whether it was safe to cross. One look was enough. We turned around and went back to the wooden canal bank road to Wist Road. This road was also full of gullies, washed out by the water coming down from the 400. While travelling south on the 400, we encountered a huge landslide just south of highway 9. The whole side of the hill had slid down, all but blocking the southbound lanes. A Gray Coach bus was lying on its side in the median. That was enough. We turned off at the Aurora side road and sought refuge at the farmhouse of George and Helen Sportel. Already 30 people were there. The men slept downstairs and the women and children upstairs, where the bedrooms were, We had no blankets, beds or pillows for the men, but at least we were high and dry. At 11 p.m., I went back to take a look at our house. It was still there, but the land was under water, and water levels were creeping up the driveway. When I tried to drive a little further, the road disappeared under water. I brought some furniture upstairs, but still did not think that the water would reach the floor, which at that time was still at least 2' above the flood. The next morning at 6 a.m., we climbed a hill, and saw a Holland Marsh that was now a large lake. Only the roofs of the houses seemed to be above the water. It was a cold, still morning, but sunny, and for the first time in weeks it was not raining.

Edo Knibbe

Holland Landing freight shed fire

"The G.T.R. freight sheds at Holland Landing narrowly escaped being consumed by fire at 12 o'clock on Saturday [April 29th]. After doing about $100 damage to the roof the fire got under control. The fire is supposed to have been caused by a passing locomotive."

Bradford Witness

Evans, John & Jaques, Nancy

Event Date : Saturday, August 14, 1965
Event Type : Marriage

Description : Nancy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Jaques, R.R. 2, Newmarket, to John Evans of Bradford, son of D. Arthur Evans, M.P.P. and Mrs. Evans of Bradford. The wedding took place in Holland Landing United Church. Rev. Donald J. Lute officiated. Mrs. George Hunt, of Bradford, sister of the bride was matron of honour. The bridesmaids were Miss Winnie Miedema of Bradford and Miss Ann Romagnoli of R. R. 2 , Newmarket. The junior attendants were the groom's sister, Miss Cathy Evans, as flower girl and Brian Heyland, son of Dr. and Mrs. P. Heyland of Bradford, as ring bearer. Mr. Don Evans of Bradford was his brother's groomsman and the ushers were Messers. Robin Evans and Terry Jaques. Mr. and Mrs. Evans will reside in Bradford.

Bradford Witness

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