Showing 325 results

Archival description
WEGWHIST Collection
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

303 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

1934 Brought First Settlement to Holland Marsh

"The first year-round residents of the Marsh arrived in the late autumn of 1934 and took up residence in the row of houses shown in the above picture. They were families from Holland and they named their village Ansnorveld.
Members of the Christian Reformed Church, after selling their first crops, built the first church on the Marsh, also shown above, in the spring of 1936. Today there are two beautiful Christian Reformed churches on the Holland Marsh."

Bradford Witness

1969 Detroit Tigers

This baseball team photograph of the Detroit Tigers contains Mike Kilkenny, a Bradford resident signed on to the team in 1964.

A Heritage Moment - Trinity Anglican Church, Bond Head

Description : On the north side of the 7th Line, about 1 km. west of Bond Head, there is a metre-high cairn in the fence line, that marks the location of the home and church built by the Rev. Featherstone Osler in the late 1830s. The frame church, that would become Trinity Anglican Church in Bond Head, was initially planned a lecture base for divinity students, church school, and centre for baptisms and marriages. It was during this time, that four sons were born to the Oslers - Feathersone, Britton, Edmund and William. The two elder sons became lawyers of note, Edmund a banker, and William, a doctor who was knighted for his service to his fellow man, and whose work changed the nature of medical practice and diagnosis. A number of medical facilities in Ontario have been named in honour of Sir William Osler, and at Trinity Anglican Church today, a memorial window and brass plaque are of great interest to the members of the medical profession who come from all over the world to visit the birthplace of this leader of their chosen profession. The Osler timber-frame country church, with its stucco coating, was moved in September of 1885 from the 7th Line to the top of the hill, at the northwest corner of Bond Head. It was rollered down the rural road in sections, reassembled, then given a veneer of brick and a new steeple. New oak pews were installed, and the interior was trimmed in oak. Much of the original interior and exterior still survive, including items used by Rev. Osler himself. On December 20th, 1885, Rev. Osler travelled from his Dundas charge to officially open the renovated church in its new location. Recently, Dr. Watters, a local resident and retired surgeon, speaking to the Bradford West Gwillimbury Local History Association, stated, "The old Osler church built and preached in by the Reverend Featherstone Osler, home to his astonishing family, is a piece of Canadian history of interest around the world. We must find some way to preserve the Osler church as part of that character, and as a reminder of the kind of people who began it."

Bradford West Gwillimbury Times

A new name for the new school

On May 13th, parents and other members of the school communities of Fred C. Cook, W.H. Day and Sir William Osler Public Schools met to consider the names suggested for the new Bradford elementary school on Professor Day Drive. Following the protocol established by the Simcoe County District School Board, parents and students at the three "feeder" schools were invited to submit names for consideration. Among the suggestions: Susan Cassidy, the first teacher in Bradford; Charles Evans,; Jean Kell; Gordon Compton; Dr. Blackwell; and Kristin Coombes. Not all the suggestions were people: some were descriptive, like Trillium, Fieldcrest, Hillside and Windy Hill. On May 21st, a special committee consisting of a parent representative from each school council, a member of the Town Council, Superintendent Stan Wells, Trustee Bob Evans, and new Principal Marlane Brooks, will meet to select 3 names, to be recommended to the School Board - which will make the final decision, possibly on June 16th. Brooks emphasized the importance of the name selection process, noting, "It's a new beginning."

Bradford West Gwillimbury Times

Accident - George Stoddart

"Yesterday afternoon Mr. Geo. Stoddart met with a serious accident. He was working on the new school building at Middleton, and the scaffold on which he was standing at the time gave way precipitating him, and Mr. Fred McKay, to the ground a distance of about 25 feet. Mr. McKay escaped unhurt, while Mr. Stoddart sustained a broken leg at the ankle. The nature of the break is considered to be quite serious, and may mean amputation of the right foot."

Bradford Witness

Agriculture

Contains items relating to Agricultural history in Bradford West Gwillimbury. Headings include: 1861 Ag. Report on Census Agricultural Articles and Advertisements Ontario Farmer Articles Market & Price Information Farm Innovation Dairy Farm Names/Information Fences Agriculture - Other

WEGWHIST Collection

Ansnorveld Public School

This is the opening of Ansnorveld Public School in September of 1935. The first teacher was Miss. Aileen Nolan. In 1957 Mr. Dan Blake of Bradford was the main instructor.

Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library

Architecture

Contains items relating to Architecture. Headings include: Historical Homes and Buildings Housing Outside WG
*Architecture - Other

WEGWHIST Collection

Armson/Wood House

Armson - Wood House on the south half of Lot 5, Concession 7. William Armson came to West Gwillimbury in 1820 and was granted a 200 acre piece of land (Lot 5, Con. 7). The home pictured was built of mud brick by the Armson family. Robert Wood bought it in 1881 and it was still in the Wood family in 2004. This photograph is thought to have been taken around 1890.

Left to Right: Joe Reynolds, Joseph Wood Sr.(Joe's grandfather), Addison with the dog (young child in front), Jean W. (child) with Ada, Robert W. (Joe's father), William Wood (in Mrs. Joseph Wood's arms), Susan Wood (Mrs. Russell Stone), Alex on the horse.

WEGWHIST Collection

Results 1 to 10 of 325