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150 friends attend her 99th birthday

  • CA BWGPL PH26354

Municipality :
Community : West Gwillimbury
Lot :
Concession :
Description : Mrs. Suzanna Armstrong turns 99. She recollects parts of her life and tells what it is like to be 99 years old.

17th Child

  • CA BWGPL OS10600
  • 1972

York County Hospital established a record Monday when a Bradford area woman Mrs. Rosella Bell gave birth to her 17th child - a 10lb., one ounce girl. Mrs. Bell has had more children than any other mother at the hospital - and it's her last, she says. Her husband Roy works at Greenacres Home for the Aged. The couple already has 11 girls and five boys ranging in age from three years to 21.

1976 Was a Year Most Vegetable Growers Would Like to Forget

  • CA BWGPL PH25660

Municipality :
Community : Holland Marsh
Lot :
Concession :
Description : 1976 Was a Year Most Vegetable Growers Would Like to Forget
By Matthew Valk

The end of the year is a time when most of us look back on what we have accomplished and look forward to better things to come. 1976 was a year that many growers would like to forget.

The first few months were a struggle to sell a large crop of carrots which never brought more than $1 per bushel; in many cases, it was far less.

A large volume was fed to cattle. There were some hopes that the stabilization board would help to reduce the large financial losses, which most growers were facing. However, after several months of negotiations, Ottawa came across with a measly $2.25 per ton which would not pay for the seed.

The 1976 growing season was also less than desirable. Apart from a warm month of April, the early spring was cold and wet. June was more like what we were looking for, warm and dry, but the months that followed produced cool temperatures and lots of rain.

Diseases were more prevalent than usual, particularly "blast" in onions. Harvesting weather was deplorable; rain and cloudy weather hampered field operations which were mostly stop and go. Although storage temperatures were fairly good for carrots, the high humidity caused a lot of headaches for onion growers.

The market situation has made some compensation for all these problems. The price of carrots and onions has been somewhat better than last year and prospects for the new year are good.

The reason for this is that growers in other parts of the world have had and are still having still bigger battles with the weather than we have had. Everyone has heard about the drought in Europe and the shortages.

In particular, potatoes and onions have been in great demand by European buyers and large quantities have been going overseas. Although most of the onions have been shipped by U.S. shippers, the effect has been a steady market for us as well.

Recent abnormal rainfall in the southern USA, mainly Texas, is affecting the growth of onions and carrots and the volume that may be expected in the next few months.

The acreage of these crops will certainly be down from normal and the quality could be affected due to the wet field conditions so far. So as we go into the new year, there seems to be nothing new as far as marketing our produce is concerned.

As usual, our marketing problem is really a production problem. The weather factor continues to play a big role in the volume of production. Growers usually say that they are better off if we all produced less and received more. No one can argue with this philosophy.

Since no one will volunteer to reduce production (this is against a grower's nature), the weather is left to do the regulating for us.

As we go into the New Year, I would like to wish friends and readers a healthy, happy and prosperous 1977 and good markets.

31 Ontario Scholars At City High Schools

  • CA BWGPL PH26550

Municipality :
Community : Barrie
Lot :
Concession :
Description : This year the three Barrie high schools have graduated 31 Ontario Scholars -- students in grade 13 with an average of 80 per cent or better.
There were 16 Ontario scholars at North, 12 at Central and three at Eastview.
The top grade 13 student in the city is a young man who shoots through course the way he shoots golf.
Ian Postnikoff, a student at North Collegiate, shoots golf in the low 90s and this year he earned an average of 91.4 per cent in Grade 13. Ian is 18 and will be entering the University of Toronto to take honors science in the fall and he plans to become a medical doctor.
Ranks Second
Valerie Thompson, 17, also a Barrie North student ranked second in the city with an average age of 89.6 per cent. Valerie has been active in the high school drama club. This summer she plans to stay at home to enable her mother to take a summer course.
Valerie is entering York University on a scholarship and she plans to take an honors BA.
Marsha Goodhead, 19, stood third with an average of 89.4 per cent. Martha has been on the student council at Barrie North and she has spent much of her spare time working as a candy striper and Sunday school teacher. She will be entering the pre-medicine course at Queen's University in the fall.
Top Student
Dianne Beelen, 17, was the top student in grade 13 at Barrie Central Collegiate with an average of 88.3 per cent. Dianne has been active in both the glee club and the classics culb at Central. She plans to take French and Latina at the University of Toronto.
Judy Mason, 19, ranked second at Central with an average of 87.8 per cent. She's been active in a number of school organizations. Judy was president of the classic club, make-up director for the drama club, an executive in the biology club and a trombone player in the band.
Stanley Isbrandt, 18, also a student at Central obtained an average of 86 per cent. Stanley played the tuba in the school band for five years. This summer he is working for his father in construction In the fall he will go to the University of Waterloo to take honors math.
Ken Collum, 18, was the top student in grade 13 at Eastview Secondary School. He is an avid chess player and was president of the chess club at Eastview.
He is working on the farm for the summer and will attend the University of Waterloo next year where he will take math and computer science.
Alan Kneeshaw stood second at Eastview students will be receiving the $150 Ontario Scholarships as will the following 16 students from North: Wayne Campbell, Nancy Daym Glenn Godfrey, Marsha Goodhead, Terry Henry, Greg Kneeshaw, Murray Maw, Wendall McArthur, Ian Postnikoff, Lesley Reid, Julia Smith, Valerie Thompson, Chris Thorpe, Donna Tuck, Grace Veenema, John Wilson.

4-H Club Year End

  • CA BWGPL PH25651

Municipality :
Community : Bradford West Gwillimbury
Lot :
Concession :
Description : 4-H Club Year End

Cookstown Public School was quite active last Saturday afternoon as over 100 women and girls attended the 4-H activity day, put on by 4-H girls from Bradford, Ivy, Beeton, Everitt, Bond Head, Tottenham, and Hill and Valley groups.

The girls put on charades about etiquette, discussed judging and arranging of flowers, and gave plans for arranging a birthday party, and voted on next year's projects which will have a definite focus on living involving spring cotton reviews.

In the afternoon the girls record books were on display for the mothers to enjoy, and they also showed their decorated boxes which were made to hold reference files. Plays and exhibits were offered in both serious and funny presentations in order to draw attention to the fun that can be enjoyed while serious learning is taking place.

Most of the theme centered around manners, etiquette and table setting. Comments were made to the girls by visiting home economists to assist them in future clubwork, and the Bradford leaders Mrs. Swan and Mrs. Klop were quite proud of the achievements of their girls.

Projects awards were given to DonnaLee Lloyd, Nancy Jean Clubine, Lynda Slingerland, and Cathy Lewis. Achievement awards were given to Judy McArthur, Lyna McVety, Susan Robertson, and Ellen Masin, and Linda McArthur. Now the girls can go on and work toward receiving County and Provincial awards in the years to come.

7th Line Bond Head

  • CA BWGPL OS9409

Looking west on the 7th Line of Tecumseth. Note the board sidewalk along the road leading to Trinity Anglican Church (about 1850s).

8th Canadian Field Ambulance Officers and NCOs

  • CA BWGPL OS9855
  • Item
  • November 1918

This image documents the 8th Canadian Field Ambulance at the time of the signing of the armistice ending WWI on November 11, 1918 and can be found in a war photograph album belonging to Lieutenant Colonel Ernest Raymond Selby. The photographs in the album are both original photographs taken by Dr. Selby and copies of official Canadian military photographs. Selby was born in and grew up in the Bradford West Gwillimbury area before moving to Calgary, Alberta. Many of the men pictured were awarded medals in recognition of honour and/or bravery.

Top Row: Sgt. Maguire, Sgt. F. E. Dutton, Cpl. Brewster, Sgt. Munis, Sgt. Davidson, R.S.M. Coward, R.S.M. G. Taylor, Staff-Sgt. Graydon, Sgt. Nash, Cpl. Tillett, Cpl. Guthrie, Sgt. Patience
Middle Row: Capt. R. M. Harvie, Capt. A. S. Lamb, Capt. D.C. Malcolm, Major W. G. Cosbie, Lt-Col. E. R. Selby, Major W. J. MacKensie, Capt. J. F. Sparrow, Capt. Knight, Capt. Christie
Bottom Row: Sgt. H. Hay, Sgt. Montgomery, Cpl. Clements, Sgt. Valiquet, Sgt. Wyers, Sgt. Cowan, Sgt. Coleman, Sgt. Holding, Cpl. Lean

Ernest Raymond Selby, Dr.

8th Line Survey Line

  • CA BWGPL OS9922

The survey line for the 8th line in West Gwillimbury, looking west from Lots 10 and 11, Concession 8.

90th Birthday - Bertha Langford

  • CA BWGPL OS10374
  • Item
  • 1980-09-06

Bradford's Bertha Langford celebrated her 90th birthday last week with more than 200 family and friends in attendance. The energetic lady still loves to bowl. Happy birthday!

Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library

A country home away from home

  • CA BWGPL PH26624

Municipality :
Community : Bradford
Lot :
Concession :
Description : Twenty-nine years ago, Ross and Shirley Klubine took over the Klubine family farm on Highway 11, just north of Bradford. The beautiful brick farmhouse, built circa 1850, had become "somewhat decrepit." They replaced the front entry and, using family photographs, repaired and restored the verandah. They opened their doors to visitors, starting the first "Bed and Breakfast" establishment in Simcoe County. A sign proclaiming the "Country Guest Home" went up at the end of a drive lined with majestic maple trees, and immediately attracted the attention of the local health inspector. Both Ross and Shirley were involved in the venture. Seven years ago Ross passed away, and was buried in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, on land that is still part of the farm. Now her baked goods, and fresh jams, are two of the staples on the breakfast table at the Guest Home, that bring visitors back, again and again. The Country Guest Home is open all year round, but summer is the peak season. Rates have remained reasonable, and include a full home cooked breakfast.

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