Showing 413 results

Archival description
Part
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

410 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

10 Joseph Street (72 Barrie Street) - Dr. Blackwell's House

Dr. Gilbert Blackwell’s House is located on the southwest corner of Barrie and Joseph Streets at 72 Barrie Street. His office faced Joseph Street. The structure was built in 1935 by builder Art Saint in the Arts and Crafts style.
The simple form has an asymmetrical façade and a rectilinear plan. A broad, steeply-pitched, bell-cast roof with a centre dormer extends down to reduce the scale of the building from the street. It also covers the original front porch (which has been enclosed). The structure has wide window openings with low floor to ceiling heights. A wide band of windows across the front of the dormer emphasizes the horizontal lines and massing of this house. Smaller, second-storey windows in the front dormer are offset from the ground-floor windows and have plain, wood sills and trim. The original arched openings in the front porch have been infilled and new windows have been installed. Brackets support the cornice at the roof and there is a central, brick chimney. The house has wood frame construction, stucco cladding and a painted, concrete foundation. A mix of exterior cladding materials is common to this style. The windows, awnings, and the one-storey, rear addition are not original. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is in good condition with some original features. (1, 3)

George Jackson

110 Church Street - The Scott House

The Scott House is located at 110 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the neoclassical style around 1870. The two-storey, rectangular main building has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof with identical chimneys at both ends that have elaborate, corbelled brickwork. The original, single-storey, rear additions have been modernized (as required). There is a wide entrance that includes a glazed door, sidelights, a transom, and deep, painted, wood panel reveals. The semi-circular entrance portico has Doric columns, stylized entablature and a balustrade feature that is not original. It is, however, still considered to be in keeping with the style of the house. The original verandah was on the front and left side of the house and the upper balcony was accessible by an upstairs doorway. The house has large, 6/6 double-hung windows with wide, exterior, moulded-wood casings. Names and a year have been scratched into the bottom pane of glass. There are sculptured, curvilinear soffit brackets and end, gable wall eaves returns. The house has wood plank construction, a painted stucco exterior finish, painted exterior wood trim, and a stone foundation. Stucco was likely the original cladding, as plank construction enabled the plastering of interior wall surfaces and the stuccoing of exterior ones. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is well-maintained. It also notes that the modernization and remodelling are sympathetic with the original building. (1, 3)

George Jackson

110 Church Street - The Scott House

The Scott House is located at 110 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the neoclassical style around 1870. The two-storey, rectangular main building has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof with identical chimneys at both ends that have elaborate, corbelled brickwork. The original, single-storey, rear additions have been modernized (as required). There is a wide entrance that includes a glazed door, sidelights, a transom, and deep, painted, wood panel reveals. The semi-circular entrance portico has Doric columns, stylized entablature and a balustrade feature that is not original. It is, however, still considered to be in keeping with the style of the house. The original verandah was on the front and left side of the house and the upper balcony was accessible by an upstairs doorway. The house has large, 6/6 double-hung windows with wide, exterior, moulded-wood casings. Names and a year have been scratched into the bottom pane of glass. There are sculptured, curvilinear soffit brackets and end, gable wall eaves returns. The house has wood plank construction, a painted stucco exterior finish, painted exterior wood trim, and a stone foundation. Stucco was likely the original cladding, as plank construction enabled the plastering of interior wall surfaces and the stuccoing of exterior ones. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is well-maintained. It also notes that the modernization and remodelling are sympathetic with the original building. (1, 3)

George Jackson

110 Church Street - The Scott House

The Scott House is located at 110 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the neoclassical style around 1870. The two-storey, rectangular main building has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof with identical chimneys at both ends that have elaborate, corbelled brickwork. The original, single-storey, rear additions have been modernized (as required). There is a wide entrance that includes a glazed door, sidelights, a transom, and deep, painted, wood panel reveals. The semi-circular entrance portico has Doric columns, stylized entablature and a balustrade feature that is not original. It is, however, still considered to be in keeping with the style of the house. The original verandah was on the front and left side of the house and the upper balcony was accessible by an upstairs doorway. The house has large, 6/6 double-hung windows with wide, exterior, moulded-wood casings. Names and a year have been scratched into the bottom pane of glass. There are sculptured, curvilinear soffit brackets and end, gable wall eaves returns. The house has wood plank construction, a painted stucco exterior finish, painted exterior wood trim, and a stone foundation. Stucco was likely the original cladding, as plank construction enabled the plastering of interior wall surfaces and the stuccoing of exterior ones. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is well-maintained. It also notes that the modernization and remodelling are sympathetic with the original building. (1, 3)

George Jackson

143 Barrie Street

This is the front view of the house located mid-block on the east side at 143 Barrie Street. It was the last house built by Art, Tom and Len Saint after WWI. The building was constructed in 1925 in the Arts and Crafts style. It became the home of many people, including Erv Hill and his wife. He worked for Dennis Nolan and was a noted (Ford) mechanic. Harold Seaurow and his wife (who came from Grand Valley) later bought and moved into this house. Harold was a car salesman and a partner with Wink Crake for a while. He then went with Jim (Catania) and Brad Walker.
The 1½-storey ‘bungalow’ has an asymmetrical façade and a rectilinear plan. A broad, medium-pitched, gabled hip roof extends down to reduce the scale of the building. The slightly-raised porch is entered from the front. The roof, horizontal siding, and a wide band of windows across the front of the porch emphasize the horizontal lines and massing of the style. There are wide window openings with low floor to ceiling heights. Multiple, double-hung windows are set into wide segmented, arched openings with 1/1 panes, lug sills of precast concrete, and brick voussoirs at the arches. The smaller, second-storey windows are offset from the ground floor windows. They are set into a gable and dormers and have plain, wood sills and trim. A bay window projects out from the south wall and has no foundation. The house has wood frame construction with masonry cladding, vinyl siding and a painted, concrete foundation. The original siding would have been wood. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is in good condition with many original features that have been maintained well. It also notes that the windows, shutters, and porch railing are not original. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

151 Church Street - The Gummerson House

The Gummerson House is located at 151 Church St. (on the southeast corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival Cottage style around the 1880’s. The Gummerson family moved to Bradford from Bond Head (on the southwest corner of Beeton Road) in 1886. This structure later became the home of Rose MacEwan. Sue and Philip Richards also lived here at one time.
The 1½-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has a one-storey and a 1½-storey rear additions. There was a barn at the rear originally. The house has a centre hall plan and a medium-pitched, gable roof with steeply-pitched dormers. It has dichromatic brickwork at the stylised quoins and a patterned belt course. There is an accent brick, diamond pattern at the dormer and gable peaks and at the curved, brick lintels at the openings. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The house has four-pane, casement windows at the front and 2/2 wood, sash windows at the sides. Painted, wood, lug sills remain. The front dormer has a round-headed casement. Original windows and doors, loadbearing, brick masonry construction, and a stone foundation also remain. An inscription in a brick at the rear of the building reads: “Sept. 3, 1886 prayer meeting”. According to the 2000 inventory, the lack of Gothic Revival features (such as a porch and gingerbread trim) indicates a more modest, vernacular variation. It also notes that the house originally had three chimneys (one at each of the gable ends) and a barn at the rear. (1, 3)

George Jackson

156 John Street West

This house is located on the south side at 156 John St. West. It was originally a garage built by Merle Woodcock on his property. The structure was on the laneway that went to Holland Street. This laneway was a popular spot for sleigh rides when the Moore family had creek property many years ago. (1, 2)

George Jackson

162 Barrie Street - Professor Day House

The Professor Day House is located at 162 Barrie St. (on the northwest corner of Barrie and Queen Streets). It was built in the early 1880’s in the Gothic Revival Cottage style. Stables were originally located in the rear yard. Mrs. Creighton, a daughter of Dr. Stevenson, once lived here. A granddaughter, Gretchen Dewhurst, was still living here in 1996.
The 1½-storey, three-bay cottage has a 1½-storey, rear ‘kitchen’ wing. It also has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and a medium-pitched, gable roof with a centre gable over the entrance. An open porch with a gable roof is supported on plain wood posts with an open railing. The house has large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. There are large double-hung, multi-paned windows at the ground floor and smaller, double-hung windows at the second floor. Shallow, pediment-shaped trim is found over the ground floor windows as well as plain, wood trim on the sides with wood slip sills. There are shutters at the windows on the front façade. The house has wood frame construction with painted, stucco cladding and a stone-rubble foundation and cellar. A stone chimney and fireplace were added in the 1950’s by Reverend Creighton. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is in excellent condition with many original features (including doors and windows). It also notes that the changes that have been made to the house are in keeping with its original character. (1, 3)
Please contact the Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library (905-775-3328) if you have any other information about this photo.

George Jackson

162 Barrie Street - Professor Day House

The Professor Day House is located at 162 Barrie St. (on the northwest corner of Barrie and Queen Streets). It was built in the early 1880’s in the Gothic Revival Cottage style. Stables were originally located in the rear yard. Mrs. Creighton, a daughter of Dr. Stevenson, once lived here. A granddaughter, Gretchen Dewhurst, was still living here in 1996.
The 1½-storey, three-bay cottage has a 1½-storey, rear ‘kitchen’ wing. It also has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and a medium-pitched, gable roof with a centre gable over the entrance. An open porch with a gable roof is supported on plain wood posts with an open railing. The house has large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. There are large double-hung, multi-paned windows at the ground floor and smaller, double-hung windows at the second floor. Shallow, pediment-shaped trim is found over the ground floor windows as well as plain, wood trim on the sides with wood slip sills. There are shutters at the windows on the front façade. The house has wood frame construction with painted, stucco cladding and a stone-rubble foundation and cellar. A stone chimney and fireplace were added in the 1950’s by Reverend Creighton. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is in excellent condition with many original features (including doors and windows). It also notes that the changes that have been made to the house are in keeping with its original character. (1, 3)
Please contact the Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library (905-775-3328) if you have any other information about this photo.

George Jackson

168 Church Street - The Mark Scanlon House

The Mark Scanlon House, also known locally as ‘The Pines’, is located at 168 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival style around 1850 by Mark Scanlon. He was a lawyer and one of the original town fathers. This structure later became the home of Professor Day, the Misses Lane, and eventually lawyer Robert (Bob) Evans.
The two-storey, ‘L’-shaped farmhouse sits on a large corner lot. It has 1½-storey rear additions. The main building has an asymmetrical plan, a steeply-pitched, gable roof with dormers, and multiple chimneys. A wide entrance has sidelights and a transom with etched glass in a pattern. The wood screen door is not original. A line in the brick indicates an original wrap-around porch (Regency style). The existing porch is a twentieth-century replacement. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The large, 6/6 (original) sash windows are compatible with modern, storm additions. The bay windows are 2/2 sash. There are painted, wood lug sills and a projecting, bay window with a crenellated cap. The house has a false rose window in the side gable (with a chimney stack behind). The shutters are original. There is an elaborately-carved, deep, bargeboard trim (beneath the sloped gables only) with rectangular, upright and dropped finials. There is also dichromatic brickwork at the corner reveals, window labels, and label stops. The building has loadbearing, brick masonry construction and a stone foundation. Rare, pink brick used as cladding was possibly made in Newmarket. According to the 2000 inventory, the picturesque house is well-maintained. (1, 3)

George Jackson

Results 1 to 10 of 413