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110 Church Street - The Scott House

The Scott House is located at 110 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the neoclassical style around 1870. The two-storey, rectangular main building has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof with identical chimneys at both ends that have elaborate, corbelled brickwork. The original, single-storey, rear additions have been modernized (as required). There is a wide entrance that includes a glazed door, sidelights, a transom, and deep, painted, wood panel reveals. The semi-circular entrance portico has Doric columns, stylized entablature and a balustrade feature that is not original. It is, however, still considered to be in keeping with the style of the house. The original verandah was on the front and left side of the house and the upper balcony was accessible by an upstairs doorway. The house has large, 6/6 double-hung windows with wide, exterior, moulded-wood casings. Names and a year have been scratched into the bottom pane of glass. There are sculptured, curvilinear soffit brackets and end, gable wall eaves returns. The house has wood plank construction, a painted stucco exterior finish, painted exterior wood trim, and a stone foundation. Stucco was likely the original cladding, as plank construction enabled the plastering of interior wall surfaces and the stuccoing of exterior ones. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is well-maintained. It also notes that the modernization and remodelling are sympathetic with the original building. (1, 3)

George Jackson

110 Church Street - The Scott House

The Scott House is located at 110 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the neoclassical style around 1870. The two-storey, rectangular main building has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof with identical chimneys at both ends that have elaborate, corbelled brickwork. The original, single-storey, rear additions have been modernized (as required). There is a wide entrance that includes a glazed door, sidelights, a transom, and deep, painted, wood panel reveals. The semi-circular entrance portico has Doric columns, stylized entablature and a balustrade feature that is not original. It is, however, still considered to be in keeping with the style of the house. The original verandah was on the front and left side of the house and the upper balcony was accessible by an upstairs doorway. The house has large, 6/6 double-hung windows with wide, exterior, moulded-wood casings. Names and a year have been scratched into the bottom pane of glass. There are sculptured, curvilinear soffit brackets and end, gable wall eaves returns. The house has wood plank construction, a painted stucco exterior finish, painted exterior wood trim, and a stone foundation. Stucco was likely the original cladding, as plank construction enabled the plastering of interior wall surfaces and the stuccoing of exterior ones. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is well-maintained. It also notes that the modernization and remodelling are sympathetic with the original building. (1, 3)

George Jackson

110 Church Street - The Scott House

The Scott House is located at 110 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the neoclassical style around 1870. The two-storey, rectangular main building has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof with identical chimneys at both ends that have elaborate, corbelled brickwork. The original, single-storey, rear additions have been modernized (as required). There is a wide entrance that includes a glazed door, sidelights, a transom, and deep, painted, wood panel reveals. The semi-circular entrance portico has Doric columns, stylized entablature and a balustrade feature that is not original. It is, however, still considered to be in keeping with the style of the house. The original verandah was on the front and left side of the house and the upper balcony was accessible by an upstairs doorway. The house has large, 6/6 double-hung windows with wide, exterior, moulded-wood casings. Names and a year have been scratched into the bottom pane of glass. There are sculptured, curvilinear soffit brackets and end, gable wall eaves returns. The house has wood plank construction, a painted stucco exterior finish, painted exterior wood trim, and a stone foundation. Stucco was likely the original cladding, as plank construction enabled the plastering of interior wall surfaces and the stuccoing of exterior ones. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is well-maintained. It also notes that the modernization and remodelling are sympathetic with the original building. (1, 3)

George Jackson

111 Barrie Street

The house located at 111 Barrie St. was owned many years ago by Minnie (Spence) Hammel. It was rented to Alec and Mary Spence and Betty. When this house was built (before WWI), a wooden tank with a zinc liner was erected in the floored attic. Water was pumped to the tank by a wobble pump from a cistern in the basement. The cistern collected water from the eaves- trough around the roof. The water that flowed (by gravity) from the wooden tank was used to flush the toilet and fill up the tub before the town had water sewers in 1931. Annie Stone (from Bond Head) eventually moved into this house. She had it updated and an apartment was added upstairs. (1, 2)

George Jackson

111 John Street West

The mid-block building located on the north side at 111 John St. West was built around 1880 in the Neoclassical style. It was known locally as “The Edmanson Home”. Thomas Edmanson was an undertaker and a businessman who lived here for many years. The house became the home of Charles Soper and his wife Eva (Edmanson) and daughters Doris and Caroline before World War II.
The two-storey, rectangular building has a one-storey rear addition that was originally the summer kitchen. It also has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and a medium-pitched, gable roof. The original entrance probably had sidelights, a transom, and a roof with a steeper slope. It may also have been wider. The house has large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions and large, double-hung windows. Second-floor windows are slightly smaller than those at the ground floor (a local vernacular modification). The original windows would have been multi-paned. Wood frame construction has replacement exterior siding and there is a parged, stone foundation. The existing chimney is also a replacement. Chimneys originally located at the roof peak have been demolished. According to the 2000 inventory, the existing entrance, porch, and many windows and doors do not reflect the original design intent. (1, 2, 3)
Please contact the Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library (905-775-3328) if you have any other information about this photo.

George Jackson

112 Frederick Street

This mid-block building is located on a sloping lot at 112 Frederick Street. The structure, which was once the home of the Chantler family, was built on a sloping lot pre-1900 in the Ontario Vernacular Cottage style. The existing Frederick Street appears to be built at a higher level than the lot, indicating that this house was built before the street was paved or town services were installed.
The one-storey, three-bay cottage has a square plan with a centre hall. A box hall was typical for this style. It has a saltbox roof, a symmetrical façade, and a single door at the grade-level entrance. There are small window openings with low floor to ceiling heights and plain, wood trim and sills. Double-hung windows are not original. Wood frame construction is covered with vinyl siding. The original siding was likely wood. There is a parged, stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, few of the existing building elements appear to be original. It also notes that this modest cottage probably had few decorative details originally. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

113 Holland Street West - Art Saint House

Builder A.J. (Arthur) Saint and his wife Margaret once lived in the structure located at 113 Holland St. West. Art bought the house in 1931 and completely remodeled it. He added a walk-in refrigerator and a two-car garage in the old summer kitchen and woodshed. At the back of the lot at that time there was a two-storey barn that Art turned into a workshop. He had three children (Keith, Helen and Karen). Art died in 1952 and the house was sold a couple of years later to John DePeuter. It was later remodeled and bricked again as seen in this photo from 1995. (1, 2)

George Jackson

113 John Street East

The house located at 113 John St. East (on the southeast corner of John and Nelson Streets) was the last house on John Street East. This area was known as French Town at the time because of the French families living there who had come to Bradford to work at the sawmill and planing mills. Fred Stoddart’s pasture fields were over what is now called Colborne Street.
The small, one-storey, square-frame house with a cement cellar was built by Dan Collings in the 1940’s. He used materials from the barns behind his house in the construction. Dan eventually moved to Holland Street. He died in his 97th year. The house was sold to Couvert during World War II. Later it was owned by Len Fuller, his wife, and sons (George and Leonard). (1, 2, 4)

George Jackson

115 Hurd Street

The house located mid-block at 115 Hurd St. was built around 1920-1940 in the Gothic Revival Cottage style. It was once the home of Aldie Robinson. The Waldruff family lived here years later.
The 1½-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, a medium-pitched, gable roof and a steeply-pitched, gable dormer. The wide, ground-floor windows indicate twentieth-century construction. The openings are original, but the windows have been replaced more recently. They have cut-stone sills and steel lintels. There is a broad, brick header belt course. Long, narrow bricks which are not a standard shape are used. The house has brick veneer on wood stud construction. This indicates post-1920’s construction. There is a parged, block foundation and a wide, basement window with a window well. The use of a basement for ‘living’ space is a more modern concept related to improvements in waterproofing and insulation technologies. According to the 2000 inventory, this house incorporates modern-day construction materials, techniques, and detailing. It also notes that the entrance door and sidelight, metal awning, and wood porch are recent additions. (1, 3)

George Jackson

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