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George Jackson
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13 and 15 John Street West

The mid-block duplex located at 13 and 15 John St. West was built pre-1900 in the Neoclassical Duplex style. During the 1920’s, the building was moved back from the street and onto new concrete foundations that were built by Leonard Saint. The building was a rental property that was possibly owned by Jim Webb at one time.
The 1½-storey, rectilinear building has a shallow, gable roof and paired entrances at the centre of the building. Window and door openings are not original and they have been significantly altered. The chimneys and shutters are also not original. Bevelled, vinyl siding conceals alterations to the structure beneath. Originally, the cladding may have been wood cove siding over the wood frame construction. According to the 2000 inventory, apart from the building’s form, little of the original building remains (including the parged-stone foundation). Additions and alterations, such as the front metal awning, entrance doors with side panels, and the windows are unsympathetic with the original character of the building. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

130 Church Street - The George Green House

The George Green House is a corner building located at 130 Church Street. It was built in the Gothic Revival style in the 1890’s. Originally, there was a barn located in the rear yard. The two-storey, two-bay house has a one-storey kitchen addition at the rear. It also has a rectangular plan, a side hall, and narrow window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The building has a medium-pitched, gable roof. An asymmetrical façade has an open, covered, entrance porch with a hip roof that is raised slightly above grade. The porch roof is supported on turned posts with decorative, ‘gingerbread’ trim. There is a Regency entrance door with a transom and sidelights. The double-hung windows are not original. Plain, wood trim and sills still remain. The house has wood frame construction, wood shiplap siding, a stone foundation, and a cellar under the main portion of the house. The original siding was stucco and the chimney and shutters are later additions. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is in good condition with some original features. (1, 3)

George Jackson

131 Church Street

The house located at 131 Church St. (on the southeast corner of Church and Hurd Streets) was built pre-1900 in the Gothic Revival style. It was once the home of the Taylor family.
The 1½-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has a centre-hall plan and a medium-pitched, gable roof. There is a gable dormer centered in the main, gable roof. At the time of the 2000 inventory, the house had aluminum siding on wood stud framing. The original cladding was wood cove siding. It was notes that only the basic form gives some clue as to the age of the structure. Many historical features are concealed by the use of modern cladding, the replacement windows, and the many trees on the property. (1, 3)

George Jackson

135 Barrie Street - The Fred C. Cook House

The Fred C. Cook House is located mid-block on the east side at 135 Barrie Street. The house was built in the Arts and Crafts style around 1925 by Art Saint. It is believed that this lot was originally owned by Fred Stoddart. This was the home of Fred Cook and Leona (Miller) until they died after WWII. The house was later bought and remodeled by Gary and Rosemary Woodcock. He had a plumbing and heating business. Their son Gary Paul was a business partner.
The 1½-storey ‘bungalow’ has a simple form, an asymmetrical façade, and a rectilinear plan. A broad, steeply-pitched, bell-cast roof extends down to reduce the scale of the building. The covered, raised porch is entered from the side. The roof, horizontal siding, and a wide band of windows across the front of the porch emphasize the horizontal lines and massing of the style. Multiple, double-hung windows are set into wide, rectangular openings with high floor to ceiling heights on the ground floor. Smaller, second-storey windows are offset from the ground-floor windows and set into a gable and dormers. The lintels and lug sills are made of precast concrete. There is a parged, concrete foundation and wood frame construction with masonry cladding and vinyl siding. The original siding would have been wood. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is in excellent condition and the original features have been maintained well. It also notes that although the porch was enclosed sometime after the original construction, it is in keeping with the original design intent. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

136 Barrie Street

The house located at 136 Barrie St. was once owned by Dr. F.C. Stevenson. It was enlarged to become a nursing home (possibly TLC) after 1945 (1950?). (1)

George Jackson

138 Hurd Street

The house located at 138 Hurd St. (on the southeast corner of Hurd and Essa Streets) was built in the Ontario Vernacular Cottage style around 1860-90. It was the home of Howard Bowser many years ago. He worked for Dennis Nolan.
The one-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has a simple, square plan and a pointed, hip roof. It also has a symmetrical façade and there is a lack of decoration or a porch addition. The entrance door has a transom above. Narrow windows (replacements) have plain, wood lug sills and trim. This modest house has wood frame construction and a parged, stone foundation. The original stucco is now covered by wood cladding. According to the 2000 inventory, the building once had a small porch at the front entrance and a large verandah at the rear. (1, 3)

George Jackson

139 John Street West

This house is located at 139 John St. West (on the northwest corner of John and Essa Streets). It was built in the 1900’s by carpenter Dalt Coburn. Originally, there was a laneway behind the house that ran west to Toronto St. and a vacant lot next door. The 1½-storey, frame house had many gables. There was a fire here at one time. Dalt raised his family (including son Des) here before moving to Cookstown in the early 1930’s. James Pelovich and his son Jim lived here in 1935. Later George Sadovchuk and his mother (Stephanie Semenuk Sadovchuk) lived here. Stephanie was James Pelovich's mother. George remodelled the house extensively. The veranda at the top was removed and the brick was matched. (1, 2)

George Jackson

141 James Street

The building located at 141 James St. was once the home of Alex Spence. It was also rented by Peter Scroogal at one time. (1)

George Jackson

143 Barrie Street

This is the front view of the house located mid-block on the east side at 143 Barrie Street. It was the last house built by Art, Tom and Len Saint after WWI. The building was constructed in 1925 in the Arts and Crafts style. It became the home of many people, including Erv Hill and his wife. He worked for Dennis Nolan and was a noted (Ford) mechanic. Harold Seaurow and his wife (who came from Grand Valley) later bought and moved into this house. Harold was a car salesman and a partner with Wink Crake for a while. He then went with Jim (Catania) and Brad Walker.
The 1½-storey ‘bungalow’ has an asymmetrical façade and a rectilinear plan. A broad, medium-pitched, gabled hip roof extends down to reduce the scale of the building. The slightly-raised porch is entered from the front. The roof, horizontal siding, and a wide band of windows across the front of the porch emphasize the horizontal lines and massing of the style. There are wide window openings with low floor to ceiling heights. Multiple, double-hung windows are set into wide segmented, arched openings with 1/1 panes, lug sills of precast concrete, and brick voussoirs at the arches. The smaller, second-storey windows are offset from the ground floor windows. They are set into a gable and dormers and have plain, wood sills and trim. A bay window projects out from the south wall and has no foundation. The house has wood frame construction with masonry cladding, vinyl siding and a painted, concrete foundation. The original siding would have been wood. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is in good condition with many original features that have been maintained well. It also notes that the windows, shutters, and porch railing are not original. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

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