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168 Church Street - The Mark Scanlon House

The Mark Scanlon House, also known locally as ‘The Pines’, is located at 168 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival style around 1850 by Mark Scanlon. He was a lawyer and one of the original town fathers. This structure later became the home of Professor Day, the Misses Lane, and eventually lawyer Robert (Bob) Evans.
The two-storey, ‘L’-shaped farmhouse sits on a large corner lot. It has 1½-storey rear additions. The main building has an asymmetrical plan, a steeply-pitched, gable roof with dormers, and multiple chimneys. A wide entrance has sidelights and a transom with etched glass in a pattern. The wood screen door is not original. A line in the brick indicates an original wrap-around porch (Regency style). The existing porch is a twentieth-century replacement. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The large, 6/6 (original) sash windows are compatible with modern, storm additions. The bay windows are 2/2 sash. There are painted, wood lug sills and a projecting, bay window with a crenellated cap. The house has a false rose window in the side gable (with a chimney stack behind). The shutters are original. There is an elaborately-carved, deep, bargeboard trim (beneath the sloped gables only) with rectangular, upright and dropped finials. There is also dichromatic brickwork at the corner reveals, window labels, and label stops. The building has loadbearing, brick masonry construction and a stone foundation. Rare, pink brick used as cladding was possibly made in Newmarket. According to the 2000 inventory, the picturesque house is well-maintained. (1, 3)

George Jackson

168 Church Street - The Mark Scanlon House

The Mark Scanlon House, also known locally as ‘The Pines’, is located at 168 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival style around 1850 by Mark Scanlon. He was a lawyer and one of the original town fathers. This structure later became the home of Professor Day, the Misses Lane, and eventually lawyer Robert (Bob) Evans.
The two-storey, ‘L’-shaped farmhouse sits on a large corner lot. It has 1½-storey rear additions. The main building has an asymmetrical plan, a steeply-pitched, gable roof with dormers, and multiple chimneys. A wide entrance has sidelights and a transom with etched glass in a pattern. The wood screen door is not original. A line in the brick indicates an original wrap-around porch (Regency style). The existing porch is a twentieth-century replacement. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The large, 6/6 (original) sash windows are compatible with modern, storm additions. The bay windows are 2/2 sash. There are painted, wood lug sills and a projecting, bay window with a crenellated cap. The house has a false rose window in the side gable (with a chimney stack behind). The shutters are original. There is an elaborately-carved, deep, bargeboard trim (beneath the sloped gables only) with rectangular, upright and dropped finials. There is also dichromatic brickwork at the corner reveals, window labels, and label stops. The building has loadbearing, brick masonry construction and a stone foundation. Rare, pink brick used as cladding was possibly made in Newmarket. According to the 2000 inventory, the picturesque house is well-maintained. (1, 3)

George Jackson

168 Church Street - The Mark Scanlon House

The Mark Scanlon House, also known locally as ‘The Pines’, is located at 168 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival style around 1850 by Mark Scanlon. He was a lawyer and one of the original town fathers. This structure later became the home of Professor Day, the Misses Lane, and eventually lawyer Robert (Bob) Evans.
The two-storey, ‘L’-shaped farmhouse sits on a large corner lot. It has 1½-storey rear additions. The main building has an asymmetrical plan, a steeply-pitched, gable roof with dormers, and multiple chimneys. A wide entrance has sidelights and a transom with etched glass in a pattern. The wood screen door is not original. A line in the brick indicates an original wrap-around porch (Regency style). The existing porch is a twentieth-century replacement. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The large, 6/6 (original) sash windows are compatible with modern, storm additions. The bay windows are 2/2 sash. There are painted, wood lug sills and a projecting, bay window with a crenellated cap. The house has a false rose window in the side gable (with a chimney stack behind). The shutters are original. There is an elaborately-carved, deep, bargeboard trim (beneath the sloped gables only) with rectangular, upright and dropped finials. There is also dichromatic brickwork at the corner reveals, window labels, and label stops. The building has loadbearing, brick masonry construction and a stone foundation. Rare, pink brick used as cladding was possibly made in Newmarket. According to the 2000 inventory, the picturesque house is well-maintained. (1, 3)

George Jackson

17 Barrie Street Ray's Sales & Service Ltd.

The cement brick building (with an arch) that is located at 17 Barrie St. is not the original structure at this site. Originally, there was a large frame building (used to shelter horses, a stage coach, buggies, cutters, etc.) that was part of a livery stable owned by Dave Ogilvie many years ago. It was destroyed by fire shortly after Dave bought it and the building seen in the photo is a smaller replacement. Dave also ran a stage coach line (later a taxi service) to Newmarket to meet the Metropolitan street car. Travelling salesmen would use this stage line to bring their wares and samples to town. They would stay at the Queen’s Hotel, where they would take orders from customers. They then used the stage coach and livery to go to Middletown, Bond Head, Newton Robinson, Beeton, Cookstown, Fennell’s Corner and then back home. Dave also hauled mail from the train station to the local post office, as well as to Bond Head. When automobiles replaced horses, the stables were removed from the building and people rented storage there for their vehicles. In time, Dave added a small office, toilets and gas pumps. After he died, Gordon and Mac ran the business until it was sold to Fred Gregory. Fred ran a car repair shop and employed a mechanic. Fred had a rental apartment built upstairs. It had outside stairs to the laneway. When Fred got sick he rented the building to Ray O’Neil who later bought it. Ray sold the building to the European Bakery in 1994. (1, 2)

George Jackson

170 Barrie Street - The Gib Lukes House

The Gib Lukes House is located mid-block on the west side at 170 Barrie Street. It was built post-1900 in the Edwardian Classicism style. The garage at the rear where Gib Lukes parked his Stanley Steamer automobile is currently the building at 123 Moore Street being used as the Bradford Food Bank.
The two-storey, rectangular building has a strong, simplistic underlying form. It has a two-storey projecting bay, hip roofs and projecting dormers. There is a classically-inspired entrance portico with a balcony above. The porch roof is supported on Doric colonnettes on brick piers. A pediment form highlights the entrance. The roof line has a dormer and substantial chimneys. Decorative soffit brackets surround the main eaves and dormer eaves. The house has a variety of window sizes. The brick window arch has a subtle ‘eyebrow’ detail. Transoms are found at the bay windows. The house has brick masonry construction and painted wood cornice, porch, balcony and dormer details. There is a stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is maintained well. (1, 3)

George Jackson

170 Barrie Street - The Gib Lukes House

The Gib Lukes House is located mid-block on the west side at 170 Barrie Street. It was built post-1900 in the Edwardian Classicism style. The garage at the rear where Gib Lukes parked his Stanley Steamer automobile is currently the building at 123 Moore Street being used as the Bradford Food Bank.
The two-storey, rectangular building has a strong, simplistic underlying form. It has a two-storey projecting bay, hip roofs and projecting dormers. There is a classically-inspired entrance portico with a balcony above. The porch roof is supported on Doric colonnettes on brick piers. A pediment form highlights the entrance. The roof line has a dormer and substantial chimneys. Decorative soffit brackets surround the main eaves and dormer eaves. The house has a variety of window sizes. The brick window arch has a subtle ‘eyebrow’ detail. Transoms are found at the bay windows. The house has brick masonry construction and painted wood cornice, porch, balcony and dormer details. There is a stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is maintained well. (1, 3)

George Jackson

170 Barrie Street - The Gib Lukes House

The Gib Lukes House is located mid-block on the west side at 170 Barrie Street. It was built post-1900 in the Edwardian Classicism style. The garage at the rear where Gib Lukes parked his Stanley Steamer automobile is currently the building at 123 Moore Street being used as the Bradford Food Bank.
The two-storey, rectangular building has a strong, simplistic underlying form. It has a two-storey projecting bay, hip roofs and projecting dormers. There is a classically-inspired entrance portico with a balcony above. The porch roof is supported on Doric colonnettes on brick piers. A pediment form highlights the entrance. The roof line has a dormer and substantial chimneys. Decorative soffit brackets surround the main eaves and dormer eaves. The house has a variety of window sizes. The brick window arch has a subtle ‘eyebrow’ detail. Transoms are found at the bay windows. The house has brick masonry construction and painted wood cornice, porch, balcony and dormer details. There is a stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is maintained well. (1, 3)

George Jackson

178 Barrie Street

The mid-block building located at 178 Barrie St. was built pre-1900 in the Ontario Vernacular Cottage style. The one-storey, three-bay structure has a square plan and narrow window openings with low floor to ceiling heights. It also has a shallow-pitched, hip roof, a symmetrical façade, and a centre hall plan. A box hall was typical for this style. The raised entrance may have had a porch originally. The single door has a transom. Double-hung windows (not original) have plain, wood trim and sills. Wood frame construction is clad with vinyl siding. The original siding was probably wood. There is a stone foundation and a single, brick masonry chimney at the side of the house. According to the 2000 inventory, this modest cottage probably had few decorative details originally. It also notes that other than the building’s form, few existing building elements appear to be original. (1, 3)

George Jackson

179 attend May rally of Presbyterian WMS

"The May Rally of the Barrie Presbyterian Women's Missionary Society held at the First Presbyterian Church, Collingwood, was attended by about 179 women. President Mrs. Forrest McKee, Collingwood, led using 'Let Your Light Shine' as her theme. The mediations were given by Mrs. Bernell McKay and Mrs. Mel Strachan of the the Central Oro group. Reports on the Synodical meetingg held at the Kingsway Church in Islington, were given. Mrs. R. H. McKee, Collingwood, gave ideas to everyone on how to create interest in their own congregations during her talk on Christian concerns. The ladies of the hosting church served a salad luncheon. Rev. Douglas Wilson of the First Presbyterian Church, took the afternoon session beginning with a communion service. Mrs.Stanley Bloss, area secretary of the Toronto-Kinston synodical, was the guest speaker. In her address, she pointed out that faith and truth make for a beautiful life; they wipe out all doubts. Tea and fruit breads were served at the close of the meeting."

Frances Bishop

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