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George Jackson John Street East
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101 John Street East

The mid-block building located on the north side at 101 John St. East was built pre-1900 in the Gothic Revival Cottage style. Originally, there was a woodshed across the back. It was the home of Mrs. Leduc or Mrs. Paul Courier, a French descendant from the old lumber mills. She wove rugs and blankets and repaired clothing. After her death the house was rented. Howard Robson and his wife lived here with part of their family, namely, Alvin, Garret and Phyllis. The building then became the home of Henry Pringle and his wife Joan. He was a retired railroad section man and owner of a garage on Holland Street. It was still the home of Joan Pringle when this photo was taken in 1995.
The 1½-storey, three-bay house has a rectangular plan, a centre hall, and a symmetrical façade.
Its medium-pitched, gable roof has a centre gable over the entrance. The building has small windows with low floor to ceiling heights. There are double-hung windows in rectangular openings with plain, wood frames and sills. The entrance porch, its windows, screen door, and the metal awnings are not original. A brick chimney at the exterior wall is also a recent reconstruction. The building has wood frame construction, vinyl siding and a parged stone foundation. Originally, the cladding was stucco. According to the 2000 inventory, the building’s basic form is camouflaged by the later additions. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

107 John Street East

The mid-block building on the north side at 107 John St. East was built around the 1880’s in the Gothic Revival Cottage style. The main house was moved to this site from the saw mill in Amsterdam during the early 1900’s. It was the home of Arthur “Mike” Saint and his wife Alice and children (Russell, Eric, Ralph, Zella, Rita and Archie). He had immigrated to Bradford from London, England in 1871 with his parents (William and Sarah) and siblings (Thomas, Harry, Frank, George, Annie and Maria). William died in 1875. All of his sons were in the building trade. Mike was a well-known brick layer and he also raised and showed chickens. There once was a 1½-storey frame barn at the back of the house that was used to store feed, a horse, and a cow. A chicken house was attached to the barn. A huge, old well was found (beyond the back fence) that was thought to belong to the first hotel (located on the only street) when Bradford was first founded.
The 1½-storey, three-bay house has a rectangular plan, a centre hall, a symmetrical façade with a centre gable over the entrance, and a medium-pitched, gable roof. A porch with a hip roof supported on wood posts and brick pedestals was added after the building was relocated. The enclosed porch was open originally, with only the brick pedestals remaining visible. Small windows have high floor to ceiling heights. Double-hung windows are set into rectangular openings with plain, wood frames and sills. The 2/2 windows are original. Wood frame construction is covered with vinyl siding and there is a parged, stone foundation. Originally, the cladding was stucco. According to the 2000 inventory, the building’s form is unmistakable despite the new cladding. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

113 John Street East

The house located at 113 John St. East (on the southeast corner of John and Nelson Streets) was the last house on John Street East. This area was known as French Town at the time because of the French families living there who had come to Bradford to work at the sawmill and planing mills. Fred Stoddart’s pasture fields were over what is now called Colborne Street.
The small, one-storey, square-frame house with a cement cellar was built by Dan Collings in the 1940’s. He used materials from the barns behind his house in the construction. Dan eventually moved to Holland Street. He died in his 97th year. The house was sold to Couvert during World War II. Later it was owned by Len Fuller, his wife, and sons (George and Leonard). (1, 2, 4)

George Jackson

15 John Street East

The mid-block building located on the north side at 15 John Street East was built around 1890 in the Eclectic Neoclassical style. It was the home of Miss Arnold, a well-respected member of the community, during WWI. Dick Saint had part of the house before and during WWII. The building is currently (in 2014) owned by Giuseppe (Joe) Campagnola. It has been his family’s home since the mid 1950’s.
The two-storey, rectangular building has symmetrical openings and a centre hall plan. A medium-pitched, hip roof with a curbed deck above is a Regency Revival feature. It is reminiscent of construction before a belvedere or cupola is added and it accentuates the horizontal roof-line. The upper-floor windows are narrower than the lower ones (neoclassical features). This suggests late nineteenth-century construction. The full-width, front verandah is another Regency Revival feature. Elaborately-carved, wood brackets and turned wood posts at the verandah are original. The typical low porch railing and wood newels at the stair railing are more Gothic Revival features. This building has rusticated, loadbearing, cement-block construction and a cement-block foundation. These blocks were made by William Turner during WWI. The block pattern is considered to be interesting. According to the 2000 inventory, this unique house has been well-maintained and many original features remain. It also notes that the ground-floor replacement windows with sliders, screen door, and window A/C unit are unsympathetic with the original design. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

18 John Street East - The Morton House

The Morton House is located mid-block on the south side at 18 John St. East (between Barrie and Nelson Streets). There is a common laneway adjacent to the lot on the south side. The house was built around the 1860-80’s in the Gothic Revival Cottage style. It was the home of Miss Morton, an Anglican Church Sunday School teacher. George Morton, who was born in Holland Landing, served overseas in WWI. When the second Bradford Post Office was built in 1935-36, he became the Post Master and held that position until he died.
The 1½-storey, three-bay cottage has a two-storey, rear wing that originally contained a two-storey stable and loft above. It was attached to the bake shop’s stable. There was also a large verandah on the laneway side. The garden on the east side of the house eventually became the location of a house built by Emery Belfry.
The 2000 inventory noted that the house has a modified rectangular plan and a centre entrance hall. There is a medium-pitched, gable roof with a centre gable over the entrance and a symmetrical façade. The existing porch and second-floor balcony railing replace the original verandah. The original half sidelights (with lower wood panelling) and transom at the entrance door still remain. The house has narrow window openings. Ground-floor windows are double-hung with 2/2 panes and round-arched, decorated, wood trim. A bay window on the west side (at the ground floor) has a shallow, hip roof set on a plain, wood cornice. The second-floor windows and sliding door are not original. There is a single, exterior chimney on the west side. The house has wood frame construction with painted, stucco cladding. The inventory also notes that some original details are overshadowed by the newer porch addition. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

23 and 25 John Street East

This mid-block structure is located at 23 and 25 John St. East. It was built around 1830-1860 in the Neoclassical Duplex style. Lewis Algeo, one of the first Irish settlers in West Gwillimbury and a retired farmer, once lived in the west side of the building. T. S. Graham lived in the east side in the early 1900’s. James Glynn lived here around 1916. He left it to James Nolan, son of Denis and Catherine Nolan (reeve of West Gwillimbury), his wife Clare(a piano teacher), and their son, Dennis. The east side was also once the home of Miss Dora Noble, a nurse at the new hospital in Newmarket. She lived here with her retired father (James Noble) until he passed away.
The two-storey, six-bay, semi-detached structure has a rectangular plan with a side hall entrance. It has a two-storey, ‘L’-shaped, rear extension and a medium-pitched, gable roof with chimneys set into each gable end. The formal, symmetrical façade has a series of openings arranged equally across the front. It has paired, entrance doors with side halls along the common, party wall. The raised entrances are set close to the street with side stairs and railings that are not original. Each door has a high transom light set into a plain, rectangular opening. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. Equal-sized ground and second-floor windows with high sills are set into rectangular openings with plain, wood frames and lug sills. The windows are not original. Wood frame construction is covered with vinyl siding and the building has a cut-stone foundation with a basement. Originally, the cladding was stucco. According to the 2000 inventory, few original details remain other than the building’s form. It also notes that the chimney is not original. An aggressive fire damaged much of the structure on April 6, 2015. Several residents were left homeless as a result of the fire (Bradford Times, April 7, 2015). The structure has since been demolished. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

28 John Street East

The house located mid-block at 28 John St. East was built in the Edwardian Classicism style around 1850 in Amsterdam (on the east side of the Holland River). It was moved to its current site in Bradford around 1890 by Sam Lukes to provide housing for the staff of his flour mill. His mill was in its heyday at the turn of the century (1890-1910). This structure was the home of Stewart and Ina McKenzie (editors of the Bradford Witness newspaper) in the 1930-60’s.
The rectangular, two-storey building with a centre hall plan has simple details and a hipped, ‘Pedlar’ metal roof (made by Oshawa Roofing). The original porch was significantly altered after the move from Amsterdam. The simple form and composition of the house was then highlighted with a large, classically-inspired porch that has a pediment-type, porch roof addition. A space between the brick pedestals at the porch has been infilled and the original half columns have been replaced by glazing and infill framing. The house has large window openings and the windows are metal replacements. Shutters on the second-floor are not original. The smooth, brick veneer on the wood frame construction was also added after the house was moved from Amsterdam. There is a parged, block foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the building is well-maintained l. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

33 John Street East - The Dr. Lewis Campbell House

The Dr. Lewis Campbell House is a mid-block building located at 33 John St. East. It was built in 1900 in the Eclectic Edwardian style. Dr. Lewis H. Campbell was a well-known physician, athlete, and field lacrosse player. He travelled with the local lacrosse team to Australia (where they were undefeated). The team continued playing in India and Europe before coming back home. He had the house (and his office) built here the summer he got married. He married a nurse after his first wife’s early death and continued to live and practise here until his own death. The house was then sold to another doctor. Originally there was a full, two-storey horse stable with a loft behind the house. On the south-west corner there was a room for storing harnesses, blankets, etc. This faced the back lane and was clapboard with a peaked, metal roof. At the rear of the house there was also a brick, one-storey garage and storage for a cutter, buggy, etc. It was on the north side of the laneway and was later made into a small house with a verandah closed in on the south side for Kowalchuch (a small market gardener) and his family of two girls.
The 2½-storey house has an ‘L’-shaped plan (a Gothic feature). The steeply-pitched, hip roof has a large, hipped dormer. There is a large, projecting, second-floor bay window with a balanced window opening at the ground floor. Classically-inspired colonnettes on brick and stone piers at the porch entrance are another Edwardian feature. The eaves line is not consistent. Front, projecting roof eaves are higher than at the rear of house. This is more typical of an Arts and Crafts detail. The entrance door has sidelights and the double-hung windows have decorative, multi-pane, upper-sash windows. There are rusticated stone highlights at the belt course, ground floor window sills and porch colonnettes bases at the front façade. The house has brick masonry construction. A balcony infill above the porch does not appear to be original. The roof skylight and replacement entrance stairs and railing are also modern additions. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is unique and grand, with an eclectic mix of many original details. It also notes that it was difficult to see the structure due to the surrounding trees. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

34 John Street East

The house located mid-block at 34 John St. East was built in the Ontario Vernacular style around 1850 in Amsterdam (on the east side of the Holland River). It was moved to its current site in Bradford around 1890 by Sam Lukes to provide housing for the staff of his flour mill. His mill was in its heyday at the turn of the century (1890-1910). McClary (a high school teacher) once lived here. Bert and Margaret Hunt raised their children (Phyllis, Art, Oscar, George and Lorna) here. Bob Veale, a WWI veteran and banker, lived here after WWII until his death.
The two-storey, two-bay house has a rectangular plan with a side hall, an asymmetrical façade, and a medium-pitched, hipped ‘Pedlar’ metal roof. An enclosed, entrance porch with a shallow, gable roof was added after the house was moved to Bradford. It is raised slightly above grade and has a single door and windows on three sides. The house has small window openings and double-hung windows (not original) with plain, wood trim and sills. Wood frame construction is covered with horizontal metal siding and there is a parged, stone foundation. The original cladding was probably wood cove siding. According to the 2000 inventory, the house likely had few decorative details originally. It also notes that other than the building’s form, few existing building elements appear to be original (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

43 John Street East - The William Campbell House

The William Campbell House is located mid-block on the north side at 43 John Street East. It was built around 1880 in the Gothic Revival style. This structure was once the home of William H. Campbell Sr. (a grain merchant) and his wife Bessie (Sutherland). His son Lewis was a doctor, and William L. (Billie) was a druggist. His daughter (Elizabeth/Libby) was born close to the day of the great fire of 1871 (Libby was born 15 May 1871 while the fire began on 25 May). She never married, though she took over her father's business after his death and remained in this house until her own. Dr. S. Hecking and his family purchased the house in the 1950’s and had it remodeled. He had one son (Stephen Jr.) and one daughter. As of 1995, Doctor Hecking was retired, training horses, and still riding occasionally.
The 1½-storey, ‘L’-shaped main building has a one-storey, rear addition. It also has a medium-pitched, gable roof with tall chimney stacks. An elaborately-carved bargeboard and brackets support the wrap-around porch. The wide entrance has sidelights and a transom. There are large window openings, high floor to ceiling heights, and large windows (4/4 sash windows at the ground floor). The structure has load-bearing, brick masonry construction and a stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, additions, replacement doors and the second-floor windows on the well-maintained house stray from the original design intent. (1, 2, 3, 5)

George Jackson

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