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110 Church Street - The Scott House

The Scott House is located at 110 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the neoclassical style around 1870. The two-storey, rectangular main building has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof with identical chimneys at both ends that have elaborate, corbelled brickwork. The original, single-storey, rear additions have been modernized (as required). There is a wide entrance that includes a glazed door, sidelights, a transom, and deep, painted, wood panel reveals. The semi-circular entrance portico has Doric columns, stylized entablature and a balustrade feature that is not original. It is, however, still considered to be in keeping with the style of the house. The original verandah was on the front and left side of the house and the upper balcony was accessible by an upstairs doorway. The house has large, 6/6 double-hung windows with wide, exterior, moulded-wood casings. Names and a year have been scratched into the bottom pane of glass. There are sculptured, curvilinear soffit brackets and end, gable wall eaves returns. The house has wood plank construction, a painted stucco exterior finish, painted exterior wood trim, and a stone foundation. Stucco was likely the original cladding, as plank construction enabled the plastering of interior wall surfaces and the stuccoing of exterior ones. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is well-maintained. It also notes that the modernization and remodelling are sympathetic with the original building. (1, 3)

George Jackson

110 Church Street - The Scott House

The Scott House is located at 110 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the neoclassical style around 1870. The two-storey, rectangular main building has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof with identical chimneys at both ends that have elaborate, corbelled brickwork. The original, single-storey, rear additions have been modernized (as required). There is a wide entrance that includes a glazed door, sidelights, a transom, and deep, painted, wood panel reveals. The semi-circular entrance portico has Doric columns, stylized entablature and a balustrade feature that is not original. It is, however, still considered to be in keeping with the style of the house. The original verandah was on the front and left side of the house and the upper balcony was accessible by an upstairs doorway. The house has large, 6/6 double-hung windows with wide, exterior, moulded-wood casings. Names and a year have been scratched into the bottom pane of glass. There are sculptured, curvilinear soffit brackets and end, gable wall eaves returns. The house has wood plank construction, a painted stucco exterior finish, painted exterior wood trim, and a stone foundation. Stucco was likely the original cladding, as plank construction enabled the plastering of interior wall surfaces and the stuccoing of exterior ones. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is well-maintained. It also notes that the modernization and remodelling are sympathetic with the original building. (1, 3)

George Jackson

110 Church Street - The Scott House

The Scott House is located at 110 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the neoclassical style around 1870. The two-storey, rectangular main building has a symmetrical façade, a centre hall plan, and large window openings with high floor to ceiling dimensions. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof with identical chimneys at both ends that have elaborate, corbelled brickwork. The original, single-storey, rear additions have been modernized (as required). There is a wide entrance that includes a glazed door, sidelights, a transom, and deep, painted, wood panel reveals. The semi-circular entrance portico has Doric columns, stylized entablature and a balustrade feature that is not original. It is, however, still considered to be in keeping with the style of the house. The original verandah was on the front and left side of the house and the upper balcony was accessible by an upstairs doorway. The house has large, 6/6 double-hung windows with wide, exterior, moulded-wood casings. Names and a year have been scratched into the bottom pane of glass. There are sculptured, curvilinear soffit brackets and end, gable wall eaves returns. The house has wood plank construction, a painted stucco exterior finish, painted exterior wood trim, and a stone foundation. Stucco was likely the original cladding, as plank construction enabled the plastering of interior wall surfaces and the stuccoing of exterior ones. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is well-maintained. It also notes that the modernization and remodelling are sympathetic with the original building. (1, 3)

George Jackson

151 Church Street - The Gummerson House

The Gummerson House is located at 151 Church St. (on the southeast corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival Cottage style around the 1880’s. The Gummerson family moved to Bradford from Bond Head (on the southwest corner of Beeton Road) in 1886. This structure later became the home of Rose MacEwan. Sue and Philip Richards also lived here at one time.
The 1½-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has a one-storey and a 1½-storey rear additions. There was a barn at the rear originally. The house has a centre hall plan and a medium-pitched, gable roof with steeply-pitched dormers. It has dichromatic brickwork at the stylised quoins and a patterned belt course. There is an accent brick, diamond pattern at the dormer and gable peaks and at the curved, brick lintels at the openings. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The house has four-pane, casement windows at the front and 2/2 wood, sash windows at the sides. Painted, wood, lug sills remain. The front dormer has a round-headed casement. Original windows and doors, loadbearing, brick masonry construction, and a stone foundation also remain. An inscription in a brick at the rear of the building reads: “Sept. 3, 1886 prayer meeting”. According to the 2000 inventory, the lack of Gothic Revival features (such as a porch and gingerbread trim) indicates a more modest, vernacular variation. It also notes that the house originally had three chimneys (one at each of the gable ends) and a barn at the rear. (1, 3)

George Jackson

168 Church Street - The Mark Scanlon House

The Mark Scanlon House, also known locally as ‘The Pines’, is located at 168 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival style around 1850 by Mark Scanlon. He was a lawyer and one of the original town fathers. This structure later became the home of Professor Day, the Misses Lane, and eventually lawyer Robert (Bob) Evans.
The two-storey, ‘L’-shaped farmhouse sits on a large corner lot. It has 1½-storey rear additions. The main building has an asymmetrical plan, a steeply-pitched, gable roof with dormers, and multiple chimneys. A wide entrance has sidelights and a transom with etched glass in a pattern. The wood screen door is not original. A line in the brick indicates an original wrap-around porch (Regency style). The existing porch is a twentieth-century replacement. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The large, 6/6 (original) sash windows are compatible with modern, storm additions. The bay windows are 2/2 sash. There are painted, wood lug sills and a projecting, bay window with a crenellated cap. The house has a false rose window in the side gable (with a chimney stack behind). The shutters are original. There is an elaborately-carved, deep, bargeboard trim (beneath the sloped gables only) with rectangular, upright and dropped finials. There is also dichromatic brickwork at the corner reveals, window labels, and label stops. The building has loadbearing, brick masonry construction and a stone foundation. Rare, pink brick used as cladding was possibly made in Newmarket. According to the 2000 inventory, the picturesque house is well-maintained. (1, 3)

George Jackson

168 Church Street - The Mark Scanlon House

The Mark Scanlon House, also known locally as ‘The Pines’, is located at 168 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival style around 1850 by Mark Scanlon. He was a lawyer and one of the original town fathers. This structure later became the home of Professor Day, the Misses Lane, and eventually lawyer Robert (Bob) Evans.
The two-storey, ‘L’-shaped farmhouse sits on a large corner lot. It has 1½-storey rear additions. The main building has an asymmetrical plan, a steeply-pitched, gable roof with dormers, and multiple chimneys. A wide entrance has sidelights and a transom with etched glass in a pattern. The wood screen door is not original. A line in the brick indicates an original wrap-around porch (Regency style). The existing porch is a twentieth-century replacement. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The large, 6/6 (original) sash windows are compatible with modern, storm additions. The bay windows are 2/2 sash. There are painted, wood lug sills and a projecting, bay window with a crenellated cap. The house has a false rose window in the side gable (with a chimney stack behind). The shutters are original. There is an elaborately-carved, deep, bargeboard trim (beneath the sloped gables only) with rectangular, upright and dropped finials. There is also dichromatic brickwork at the corner reveals, window labels, and label stops. The building has loadbearing, brick masonry construction and a stone foundation. Rare, pink brick used as cladding was possibly made in Newmarket. According to the 2000 inventory, the picturesque house is well-maintained. (1, 3)

George Jackson

168 Church Street - The Mark Scanlon House

The Mark Scanlon House, also known locally as ‘The Pines’, is located at 168 Church St. (on the northwest corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival style around 1850 by Mark Scanlon. He was a lawyer and one of the original town fathers. This structure later became the home of Professor Day, the Misses Lane, and eventually lawyer Robert (Bob) Evans.
The two-storey, ‘L’-shaped farmhouse sits on a large corner lot. It has 1½-storey rear additions. The main building has an asymmetrical plan, a steeply-pitched, gable roof with dormers, and multiple chimneys. A wide entrance has sidelights and a transom with etched glass in a pattern. The wood screen door is not original. A line in the brick indicates an original wrap-around porch (Regency style). The existing porch is a twentieth-century replacement. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The large, 6/6 (original) sash windows are compatible with modern, storm additions. The bay windows are 2/2 sash. There are painted, wood lug sills and a projecting, bay window with a crenellated cap. The house has a false rose window in the side gable (with a chimney stack behind). The shutters are original. There is an elaborately-carved, deep, bargeboard trim (beneath the sloped gables only) with rectangular, upright and dropped finials. There is also dichromatic brickwork at the corner reveals, window labels, and label stops. The building has loadbearing, brick masonry construction and a stone foundation. Rare, pink brick used as cladding was possibly made in Newmarket. According to the 2000 inventory, the picturesque house is well-maintained. (1, 3)

George Jackson

60 Church Street - Trinity Anglican Church

The original Trinity Anglican Church (located at 60 Church Street) was built in 1851 and then destroyed by fire in 1900. Eight months later, the current structure (built in the Gothic Revival style) was opened for service under the Rev. Canon George Benjamin Morley.
The structure has a cruciform plan, 1½ storeys, and a steeply-pitched, gable roof with a steeple. The main entrance is through an enclosed narthex dominated by a large, gothic, arched opening. It has large, rectangular, double doors with a multi-foiled transom light above (not original). Shallow buttresses support the side walls and steeple. Three narrow, gothic, arched windows are set into wide, rectangular openings to light the nave. The windows are narrow with a vertical emphasis. There are concrete lintels and lug sills. The three-part, gothic, arched windows refer to the Trinity. The building has wood frame construction with brick cladding and a cut-stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the church is in excellent condition with most of its original features.
In 2004, Trinity Anglican Church purchased the adjacent former Presbyterian Church building and land. The vacant building was demolished in 2005 to provide additional parking for the congregation of Trinity Anglican Church. (1, 3, 5, Trinity Anglican Church Bradford website)

George Jackson

67 Church Street

The building that is located at 67 Church St. (on the southeast corner of Church and James Streets) was built pre-1900 in the Ontario Vernacular Cottage style. It was moved to this site many years ago. The Robinson family once lived in this house. Mr. Robinson worked for Spence Lumber and he belonged to the Band. He had a daughter named Jean.
The one-storey, three-bay cottage has a rectangular plan with a centre hall. A box hall was typical for this style. It also has a symmetrical façade and a shallow-pitched, hip roof. The enclosed porch (added after the house was moved to this location) has a hip roof with a grade level entrance. It has a simple entrance with a single door opening to one side of the porch. Single windows to the primary rooms are found on each side of the porch. Double-hung, 2/2 windows appear to be original. The building has wood frame construction, wood shiplap siding, and a parged, stone foundation. There is a single, brick, masonry chimney at the exterior south wall. According to the 2000 inventory, this modest cottage probably had few decorative details originally. It notes that other than the building’s form, few existing building elements appear to be original. Existing James Street appears to be built at a higher level than this lot. This indicates that the house was moved here before the street was paved or town services were installed. (1, 3)

George Jackson

97 Church Street - The William Melbourne House

The William Melbourne House is located at 97 Church St. (at the corner of Church and Frederick Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival style in the 1870-80’s by Bill Curry. The 1½-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights and a steeply-pitched, gable roof. There is a centre gable over the entrance. The building has a rectangular plan and a centre entrance hall. A ‘Regency Style’ entrance has arched tracery in the multi-paned transom and sidelights. The shallow pediment, entablature, and pilasters framing the entrance indicate a neoclassical influence. The bay windows at the ground floor have three-sided, angular projections and a hip roof. A semi-circular, arched window with a transom of multi-paned fanlights is located fully within the centre gable at the second floor as well as decorative gingerbread along the eaves and verges. There is a wood ‘drop’ or pendant suspended from the mid-point of the centre gable. The finial was originally above the gable. The cornice around the roof of the bay windows is decorated with dentils. Paired brick chimneys (with stacks set on the diagonal) are found at each side of the house. The house has wood frame construction with painted stucco cladding (1933) on the original wood cove siding. It has a stone foundation. The double-hung windows and storm entrance door are not original. According to the 2000 inventory, the house is in excellent condition with many original features. The gingerbread trim was removed and the stucco was replaced with vinyl siding after the inventory. (1, 3)

George Jackson

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