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116 women at annual meeting

"Alliston - South Simcoe District Women's Institute held its 75th annual meeting in Alliston last week, with 116 delegates attending from 11 branches. District president Mrs. Paul Tipping of Tottenham and secretary treasurer Mrs. Everett McVety of Bradford were in charge.

The theme, 'What's 75 Years Between Friends?' set the tone of the meeting held at St. John's United Church. Displays showing accomplishments, projects, and history of each branch were outstanding, and discussion groups led by district conveners replaced oral reports.

Visits to Simcoe Manor will not be a district project from now on but the decision to entertain there is at each branch's discretion after conferring with the manor superintendent.

Delegates voted to hold a Tweedsmuir History workshop in November, with Cookstown being a possible location.

Mrs. Gordon Mallion of Tottenham judged the log book competition of home histories and presented prizes to: first, Mrs. Russel Browning; second, Mrs. W. Ingram, both from Churchill branch; and third, Mrs. Norman Baker, Everett.

Federated Women's Institute of Ontario board members, Mrs. Don Hennessy of Duntroon, said Simcoe County leads the province in interest in log books. County books were on display at the officers' conference at the University of Waterloo in May.

After the noon luncheon, Tweedsmuir History curator Mrs. William Sutherland of Bond Head reviewed district history. The first meeting was held in Jebb's Hall, Cookstown, on July 9, 1902, with 50 in attendance. In 1906 only four attended and for some years district meetings were held in homes.

Today there are 321 active members in Simcoe South and 46 life members. A birthday cake was cut by Mrs. Joseph Hancey of Alliston, a WI member for 61 years.

Ted Whitworth, a farm safety consultant for eight counties, told delegates there are too many accidents in agriculture. He said 'farmers must recognize hazards and he placed the responsibility on 'mother' to continue to remind her family of safety practices. Farm safety booklets brought home by school children should be reviewed by the parents with the children so both will benefit, he said.'"

Jean Saunter

22 Holland Street West - The Queen's Hotel

The Queen’s Hotel (located at 22 Holland St. West) was built circa 1850, and was originally the Western Hotel. This photo (taken in the fall of 1995) shows the structure just before a major renovation. The hotel went “dry” during World War I. Bradford, like all of Ontario, was experiencing prohibition (even though Bradford had voted “wet”). The building originally had two storeys. A third floor and a flat roof were added later. It was heated with an old steam engine that had the undercarriage removed. The engine first burnt 4’ stacks of hardwood, then coal, and finally, oil. Eventually a new furnace was installed (most likely natural gas). The building was always warm and thought of as a home away from home.
Harry Lang, Celina and their children (Evelyn, George and Audrey) moved here from North Bay and bought the building in the 1920’s. They ran the Temperance House, and a board and dining service at this location. They had long-time help and boarders. Little John Cook ran a shop selling ice cream, chocolate bars, and smokes on the east side (down one step). A bus stop was added when bus service started. Len and Art Saint put a cement addition on the back of the building around 1938. At the rear, there was a chicken house, a roofed, open shed, and a laneway. Another shed ran south, and to the west was an ice house. There was open space to the north before the laneway and a barn for hay and horses. The barn had two stories and below there was a pig sty. North of the laneway there was another open shed, car storage, and a cooking kitchen on the back of the hotel (a little east of the back entrance). Jack Wilson worked for Harry Lang for many years. Mitch Hepburn brought in beer in 1934 and the building opened as the Queen’s Hotel. Businessmen had to chip in to buy a liquor license and Hepburn was the first supplier. Business was excellent and the hotel was really crowded. Before the arrival of the beer, the locals had used it as a place to play dominoes and checkers, and to conduct hunt camp and other organizations’ meetings. (1, 2, 4)

George Jackson

22 Holland Street West - The Queen's Hotel

The Queen’s Hotel (located at 22 Holland St. West) was built circa 1850. This photo (taken in the fall of 1995) shows the structure just before a major renovation. The hotel went “dry” during WWI. Bradford, like all of Ontario, was experiencing prohibition (even though Bradford had voted “wet”). The building originally had two storeys. A third floor and a flat roof were added later. It was heated with an old steam engine that had the undercarriage removed. The engine first burnt 4’ stacks of hardwood, then coal, and finally, oil. Eventually a new furnace was installed (most likely natural gas). The building was always warm and thought of as a home away from home.
Harry Lang, Celina and their children (Evelyn, George and Audrey) moved here from North Bay and bought the building in the 1920’s. They ran the Temperance House, and a board and dining service at this location. They had long-time help and boarders. Little John Cook ran a shop selling ice cream, chocolate bars, and smokes on the east side (down one step). A bus stop was added when bus service started. Len and Art Saint put a cement addition on the back of the building around 1938. At the rear, there was a chicken house, a roofed, open shed, and a laneway. Another shed ran south, and to the west was an ice house. There was open space to the north before the laneway and a barn for hay and horses. The barn had two stories and below there was a pig sty. North of the laneway there was another open shed, car storage, and a cooking kitchen on the back of the hotel (a little east of the back entrance). Jack Wilson worked for Harry Lang for many years. Mitch Hepburn brought in beer in 1934 and the building opened as the Queen’s Hotel. Businessmen had to chip in to buy a liquor license and Hepburn was the first supplier. Business was excellent and the hotel was really crowded. Before the arrival of the beer, the locals had used it as a place to play dominoes and checkers, and to conduct hunt camp and other organizations’ meetings. (1, 2, 4)
Please contact the Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library (905-775-3328) if you have any other information about this photo.

George Jackson

64 James Street

The house located at 64 James St. was considered to be new when this photo was taken in 1995. The area behind the house was once used for lawn bowling. (1)

George Jackson

A. T. Howes & Co. Store Bill

An account bill made out to the Bradford Lawn Bowling Club by A.T. Howes & Co. Store, dated May 27th, 1911.

Bradford Lawn Bowling Club

Amy Young celebrates 80th Birthday with friends

"A surprise party was held in Bond Head Community Hall on Saturday afternoon for Amy Young of Bond Head, formerly of Beeton, on the occasion of her eightieth birthday. Many of her family, neighbours, and friends from near and far, including members of two local bowling clubs, the Women's Institute of Bond Head, the Ladies Orange Lodge of Beeton and members of the local churches, gathered to spend a pleasant social interlude with her and partake of a buffet lunch. She served her guests a piece of delicious birthday cake with George McCague, our local Member of Parliament assisting her. An address was read by Margaret Westlake, a cousin. Shelley Bishop, a niece on behalf of the friends, presented her with an engraved wrist watch as a token of respect and appreciation, and a momentum of the party. George McCague presented her with an emblem pin on behalf of the Ontario government. Mrs. Young thanked her friends for coming and for her gift and expressed her appreciation to the convenors of the party. All departed with happy memories of a pleasant afternoon."

Anglican Young People's Association pin

Pin of the Anglican Young People's Association, part of the Walter Reeves, Town Constable collection.

The Anglican Young People's Association was devised by the Anglican Church for its younger members. There was a branch of the Association based on Canada, and began in 1902.

Bill Marks

Back to Its Roots at Carrotfest

Article about the success of the 2002 Carrotfest. It outlines the food, entertainment and events that made up Carrotfest for that year.

Bradford West Gwillimbury Times

B.B. Collings Furniture Store Bill

An account bill made out to the Bradford Lawn Bowling Club by B.B. Collings Furniture & Household Item Store, dated October 29th, 1912.

Bradford Lawn Bowling Club

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