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George Jackson Renovation
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123 Moore Street

The building located mid-block at 123 Moore Street was built pre-1900 in the Gothic Revival style. It stood behind the grand, Italianate villa (The Convent) that was once located at 118 Barrie Street and was the home of the Lukes’ family. Originally, the structure was built to be a two-car garage to house Gibb Lukes’ vehicles (particularly his Stanley Steamer). The garage was eventually converted into a dwelling. At the time of this photo (1995), it was being used as the Bradford Food Bank.
The one-storey, three-bay cottage has an “L”-shaped plan with a side hall. There is an asymmetrical façade with a front gable above the façade projection and a medium-pitched, gable roof. The front wall below the gable is inset slightly to provide shelter for the front entrance. It is set into a simple, rectangular opening. Small windows that are not original have low floor to ceiling heights. They are set into rectangular openings with plain, wood frames and sills. The building has wood frame construction with stucco cladding and a parged, stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, this modest cottage has few original details other than the building’s form. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

126 John Street West

The mid-block building located on the south side at 126 John St. West was built in the 1880’s in the Gothic Revival Cottage style. Originally, there was a back lane for Jim Woods' house and barn next to this house. Pratt lived here many years ago with his wife and two sons. Elgar Houghton bought this house around the time of World War II. He lived there for a time and then he had the house converted into four apartments which were rented. He later sold the building.
The 1½-storey, five-bay cottage has a rectangular plan with a centre hall, an asymmetrical façade with an off-centre gable over the entrance, and a medium-pitched, gable roof. There is a simple, rectangular entrance (at grade level) with windows to the primary rooms on each side. The existing roof over the entry is not original. Small windows at the ground and second floors are not original. They are set into segmented, arch openings with plain, wood frames and painted, stone lug sills. Brick, masonry construction is clad with stucco (not original) and the structure has a parged, stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, this modest house has few original details other than the building’s form. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

136 Barrie Street

The house located at 136 Barrie St. was once owned by Dr. F.C. Stevenson. It was enlarged to become a nursing home (possibly TLC) after 1945 (1950?). (1)

George Jackson

139 John Street West

This house is located at 139 John St. West (on the northwest corner of John and Essa Streets). It was built in the 1900’s by carpenter Dalt Coburn. Originally, there was a laneway behind the house that ran west to Toronto St. and a vacant lot next door. The 1½-storey, frame house had many gables. There was a fire here at one time. Dalt raised his family (including son Des) here before moving to Cookstown in the early 1930’s. James Pelovich and his son Jim lived here in 1935. Later George Sadovchuk and his mother (Stephanie Semenuk Sadovchuk) lived here. Stephanie was James Pelovich's mother. George remodelled the house extensively. The veranda at the top was removed and the brick was matched. (1, 2)

George Jackson

149 Queen Street

The house located at 149 Queen St. (on the northwest corner of Queen and Essa Streets) was built pre-1900 in the Ontario Vernacular Cottage style. It was once the home of the Bales family.
The 1½-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has a simple, rectangular form with a symmetrical façade and a centre hall plan. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof and a lack of decoration and porch addition. The replacement windows have the original, plain, wood lug sills and trim. Metal storm windows and the door are later additions. The structure also has a one-storey addition that was built at a later time. This structure has stucco cladding on 4” poured-in-place, concrete walls and a parged, stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the modest dwelling requires painting and landscaping. (1, 3)

George Jackson

150 Toronto Street

The mid-block building located on the west side at 150 Toronto St. (on the corner of Toronto and Queen Streets) was built around 1890-1910 in the Gothic Revival style. The 1½-storey, original farmhouse has a recent, two-storey addition, a simple rectangular form and a medium-pitched, gable roof. The original brick masonry construction was totally reclad with new brick veneer in the 1980’s. Replacement windows and doors may, or may not, be the original size and/or at the original locations. A new, parged-block foundation covers the existing stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, little of the original building is apparent apart from the form. It also notes that the new, brick cladding with dichromatic quoining, belt course, and window heads are not a convincing replication of the old-style detailing. The side-wing addition was thought to relate minimally to the main house. (1, 3)

George Jackson

156 John Street West

This one-storey house is located at 156 John St. West. The original cladding was stucco and there was a kitchen at the back. Mrs. Belfry owned the building many years ago. After her death, Merle Woodcock bought (and repaired) the house. John Holancin and his wife Zuzana (Balint) and large family lived here for a number of years. They were market gardeners on Highway #9. (1, 2)

George Jackson

187 John Street West

This house is located at 187 John St. West (on the northwest corner of John and Toronto Streets). The 1½-storey, frame building was originally clad in stucco and it had a kitchen and rooms upstairs at the rear. There was also a garden and lawn at the back of the house. George Mapes and daughter Ella (wife of Jack Gapp), Curly Madian (?) and their daughters (Vivian and Margaret) lived here at one time. George was a retired farmer, dealer, and buyer. Years later, carpenter Joe LeBlanc and his family bought the house. He remodeled it and built a porch on the east side of the kitchen. Originally, there was a long barn (with a frame loft above) at the rear of the property. Joe’s daughter eventually had a nursing home built where the barn had stood. (1, 2)

George Jackson

205 Simcoe Road

The two-storey house located at 205 Simcoe Road was bought and renovated by Mr. Bruce around 1928. Len Saint did the cement work and the plastering. William Ward and his family lived here later. He raised dogs and had a greenhouse and a garden at the back. He moved to James St. after he retired. (1, 2)

George Jackson

21 Joseph Street

The mid-block building located at 21 Joseph St. was built around 1880 in the Gothic Revival style. It is a 1½-storey, ‘L’-shaped building with a steeply-pitched, gable roof. The house has large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights and large replacement windows. It has wood frame construction and new, board and batten siding. The original cladding was stucco. According to the 2000 inventory, all early wood siding in Bradford was either cove or shiplap siding. This new siding is not historically accurate and it would have been painted a colour. A replacement porch, while generally in keeping with the original building style, does not reflect historically-accurate detailing and finishing. It also notes that little of the original building is visible except for the basic form. (1, 3)

George Jackson

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