Simcoe County

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Simcoe County

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Simcoe County

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Simcoe County

4344 Archival description results for Simcoe County

4344 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

147 and 149 James Street

The mid-block building located at 147 and 149 James St. was built pre-1900 in the Ontario Vernacular style. The 1½-storey duplex has a medium-pitched, gable roof, a simple form, and a central entrance. An existing projecting, (enclosed) entrance porch is not original. The entrance doors may have had an awning roof projection at one time. There is a lack of decoration. The aluminum (replacement) windows may have been enlarged. Wood frame construction has vinyl siding and there is a parged, block foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, this modest building displays few historical features beyond the basic form. (1, 3)

George Jackson

149 John Street West

The property located at 149 John St. West was once the site of a small, one-storey frame building with shiplap siding. It had a shed at the rear. Mr. Robinson lived here. He was crippled and played the violin on his knees. He particularly loved to play for his children. The house sat idle for many years after his death. After World War II, Al Dimock removed that original structure and built the house seen in this photo from 1995. Al lived there until he died. (1, 2)

George Jackson

149 Queen Street

The house located at 149 Queen St. (on the northwest corner of Queen and Essa Streets) was built pre-1900 in the Ontario Vernacular Cottage style. It was once the home of the Bales family.
The 1½-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has a simple, rectangular form with a symmetrical façade and a centre hall plan. It has a medium-pitched, gable roof and a lack of decoration and porch addition. The replacement windows have the original, plain, wood lug sills and trim. Metal storm windows and the door are later additions. The structure also has a one-storey addition that was built at a later time. This structure has stucco cladding on 4” poured-in-place, concrete walls and a parged, stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the modest dwelling requires painting and landscaping. (1, 3)

George Jackson

15 and 19 Holland Street East

The building located at 15 Holland St. East was bought by Harold Boyd many years ago. He ran a pool room on the ground floor on the west side. He added a second floor above the pool room for living quarters. Jack Pong owned a restaurant on the east side of the building in the 1930’s. (1, 2)
The two-storey, brick and cement building located at 19 Holland St. East was owned at one time by George Simpkins. He ran a plumbing, heating, electrical, and eavestroughing company upstairs. There was a show room downstairs and the east side was a workshop. George and his family lived on Moore St. across from Joseph Street. Ethel Gapp was his bookkeeper, Ted Gapp was his electrician, and George Manton did the heating work. They drove for miles around the country in a Model T truck. Harry Barron bought the business in the 1930’s and kept the same workmen. Then the business was moved to the southwest corner of Holland and Simcoe Streets. (1, 2)

George Jackson

15 John Street East

The mid-block building located on the north side at 15 John Street East was built around 1890 in the Eclectic Neoclassical style. It was the home of Miss Arnold, a well-respected member of the community, during WWI. Dick Saint had part of the house before and during WWII. The building is currently (in 2014) owned by Giuseppe (Joe) Campagnola. It has been his family’s home since the mid 1950’s.
The two-storey, rectangular building has symmetrical openings and a centre hall plan. A medium-pitched, hip roof with a curbed deck above is a Regency Revival feature. It is reminiscent of construction before a belvedere or cupola is added and it accentuates the horizontal roof-line. The upper-floor windows are narrower than the lower ones (neoclassical features). This suggests late nineteenth-century construction. The full-width, front verandah is another Regency Revival feature. Elaborately-carved, wood brackets and turned wood posts at the verandah are original. The typical low porch railing and wood newels at the stair railing are more Gothic Revival features. This building has rusticated, loadbearing, cement-block construction and a cement-block foundation. These blocks were made by William Turner during WWI. The block pattern is considered to be interesting. According to the 2000 inventory, this unique house has been well-maintained and many original features remain. It also notes that the ground-floor replacement windows with sliders, screen door, and window A/C unit are unsympathetic with the original design. (1, 2, 3)

George Jackson

150 Toronto Street

The mid-block building located on the west side at 150 Toronto St. (on the corner of Toronto and Queen Streets) was built around 1890-1910 in the Gothic Revival style. The 1½-storey, original farmhouse has a recent, two-storey addition, a simple rectangular form and a medium-pitched, gable roof. The original brick masonry construction was totally reclad with new brick veneer in the 1980’s. Replacement windows and doors may, or may not, be the original size and/or at the original locations. A new, parged-block foundation covers the existing stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, little of the original building is apparent apart from the form. It also notes that the new, brick cladding with dichromatic quoining, belt course, and window heads are not a convincing replication of the old-style detailing. The side-wing addition was thought to relate minimally to the main house. (1, 3)

George Jackson

151 Church Street - The Gummerson House

The Gummerson House is located at 151 Church St. (on the southeast corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival Cottage style around the 1880’s. The Gummerson family moved to Bradford from Bond Head (on the southwest corner of Beeton Road) in 1886. This structure later became the home of Rose MacEwan. Sue and Philip Richards also lived here at one time.
The 1½-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has a one-storey and a 1½-storey rear additions. There was a barn at the rear originally. The house has a centre hall plan and a medium-pitched, gable roof with steeply-pitched dormers. It has dichromatic brickwork at the stylised quoins and a patterned belt course. There is an accent brick, diamond pattern at the dormer and gable peaks and at the curved, brick lintels at the openings. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The house has four-pane, casement windows at the front and 2/2 wood, sash windows at the sides. Painted, wood, lug sills remain. The front dormer has a round-headed casement. Original windows and doors, loadbearing, brick masonry construction, and a stone foundation also remain. An inscription in a brick at the rear of the building reads: “Sept. 3, 1886 prayer meeting”. According to the 2000 inventory, the lack of Gothic Revival features (such as a porch and gingerbread trim) indicates a more modest, vernacular variation. It also notes that the house originally had three chimneys (one at each of the gable ends) and a barn at the rear. (1, 3)

George Jackson

151 Church Street - The Gummerson House

The Gummerson House is located at 151 Church St. (on the southeast corner of Church and Queen Streets). It was built in the Gothic Revival Cottage style around the 1880’s. The Gummerson family moved to Bradford from Bond Head (on the southwest corner of Beeton Road) in 1886. This structure later became the home of Rose MacEwan. Sue and Philip Richards also lived here at one time.
The 1½-storey, three-bay ‘cottage’ has a one-storey and a 1½-storey rear additions. There was a barn at the rear originally. The house has a centre hall plan and a medium-pitched, gable roof with steeply-pitched dormers. It has dichromatic brickwork at the stylised quoins and a patterned belt course. There is an accent brick, diamond pattern at the dormer and gable peaks and at the curved, brick lintels at the openings. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. The house has four-pane, casement windows at the front and 2/2 wood, sash windows at the sides. Painted, wood, lug sills remain. The front dormer has a round-headed casement. Original windows and doors, loadbearing, brick masonry construction, and a stone foundation also remain. An inscription in a brick at the rear of the building reads: “Sept. 3, 1886 prayer meeting”. According to the 2000 inventory, the lack of Gothic Revival features (such as a porch and gingerbread trim) indicates a more modest, vernacular variation. It also notes that the house originally had three chimneys (one at each of the gable ends) and a barn at the rear. (1, 3)

George Jackson

151 Frederick Street

This house is located on the north side at 151 Frederick St. (west of Essa Street). (1, 2)

George Jackson

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