Church

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1934 Brought First Settlement to Holland Marsh

"The first year-round residents of the Marsh arrived in the late autumn of 1934 and took up residence in the row of houses shown in the above picture. They were families from Holland and they named their village Ansnorveld.
Members of the Christian Reformed Church, after selling their first crops, built the first church on the Marsh, also shown above, in the spring of 1936. Today there are two beautiful Christian Reformed churches on the Holland Marsh."

Bradford Witness

60 Church Street - Trinity Anglican Church

The original Trinity Anglican Church (located at 60 Church Street) was built in 1851 and then destroyed by fire in 1900. Eight months later, the current structure (built in the Gothic Revival style) was opened for service under the Rev. Canon George Benjamin Morley.
The structure has a cruciform plan, 1½ storeys, and a steeply-pitched, gable roof with a steeple. The main entrance is through an enclosed narthex dominated by a large, gothic, arched opening. It has large, rectangular, double doors with a multi-foiled transom light above (not original). Shallow buttresses support the side walls and steeple. Three narrow, gothic, arched windows are set into wide, rectangular openings to light the nave. The windows are narrow with a vertical emphasis. There are concrete lintels and lug sills. The three-part, gothic, arched windows refer to the Trinity. The building has wood frame construction with brick cladding and a cut-stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the church is in excellent condition with most of its original features.
In 2004, Trinity Anglican Church purchased the adjacent former Presbyterian Church building and land. The vacant building was demolished in 2005 to provide additional parking for the congregation of Trinity Anglican Church. (1, 3, 5, Trinity Anglican Church Bradford website)

George Jackson

60 Church Street - Trinity Anglican Church

The original Trinity Anglican Church (located at 60 Church Street) was built in 1851 and then destroyed by fire in 1900. Eight months later, the current structure (built in the Gothic Revival style) was opened for service under the Rev. Canon George Benjamin Morley.
The structure has a cruciform plan, 1½ storeys, and a steeply-pitched, gable roof with a steeple. The main entrance is through an enclosed narthex dominated by a large, gothic, arched opening. It has large, rectangular, double doors with a multi-foiled transom light above (not original). Shallow buttresses support the side walls and steeple. Three narrow, gothic, arched windows are set into wide, rectangular openings to light the nave. The windows are narrow with a vertical emphasis. There are concrete lintels and lug sills. The three-part, gothic, arched windows refer to the Trinity. The building has wood frame construction with brick cladding and a cut-stone foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the church is in excellent condition with most of its original features.
In 2004, Trinity Anglican Church purchased the adjacent former Presbyterian Church building and land. The vacant building was demolished in 2005 to provide additional parking for the congregation of Trinity Anglican Church. (1, 3, 5, Trinity Anglican Church Bradford website)

George Jackson

66 Barrie Street - Bradford United Church

Bradford United Church is located at 66 Barrie St. The structure in this photo was built in 1865 in the Gothic Revival style. There was an original church built on this site in 1851.
The 1½-storey building has a rectangular plan, tall and narrow window openings, and a steeply-pitched, gable roof. The enclosed narthex is a recent addition. It is not considered to be consistent with the original style. Tall, gothic-style, trefoil arched openings light the nave. A round, rose window (with muntins set in the shape of a cross) is set into the gable portion of the façade. These cross-shaped muntins replace the original four-leaf clover muntins. The vergeboard has small, gothic arches. Octagonal pinnacles are found at each of the four corners. These pinnacles were originally topped with ornamental spires. Shallow buttresses extending the full height of the façade divide it into three parts. The trefoil arch and the three-part façade refer to the Trinity. There is brick masonry construction with stucco cladding and a parged, stone foundation. The original dichromatic brick cladding is concealed under the stucco cladding. Originally, the underlying red brick walls had buff-coloured brick buttresses and framing at the door and window openings. According to the 2000 inventory, the building is in good condition with some original features. (1, 3, 4)

George Jackson

66 Barrie Street Bradford United Church

Bradford United Church is located at 66 Barrie St. The structure in this photo was built in 1865 in the Gothic Revival style. There was an original church built on this site in 1851.
The 1½-storey building has a rectangular plan, tall and narrow window openings, and a steeply-pitched, gable roof. The enclosed narthex is a recent addition. It is not considered to be consistent with the original style. Tall, gothic-style, trefoil arched openings light the nave. A round, rose window (with muntins set in the shape of a cross) is set into the gable portion of the façade. These cross-shaped muntins replace the original four-leaf clover muntins. The vergeboard has small, gothic arches. Octagonal pinnacles are found at each of the four corners. These pinnacles were originally topped with ornamental spires. Shallow buttresses extending the full height of the façade divide it into three parts. The trefoil arch and the three-part façade refer to the Trinity. There is brick masonry construction with stucco cladding and a parged, stone foundation. The original dichromatic brick cladding is concealed under the stucco cladding. Originally, the underlying red brick walls had buff-coloured brick buttresses and framing at the door and window openings. According to the 2000 inventory, the building is in good condition with some original features. (1, 3, 4)

George Jackson

81 John Street West - Bradford Presbyterian Church

The Bradford Presbyterian Church was once located at 81 John St. West (on the northwest corner of Church and John Streets). A Presbyterian church in Bradford dates back to 1856. The original frame building was built on this site and used until 1893. At that time it was sold to the Anglican Church and moved a short distance north to be used as the Parish Hall. The structure seen in this photo (from 1996) was designed in the Romanesque style by Siddell Baker Architects in Toronto. It was constructed in 1893 for $5,000 by local builder Dougald (George) MacDonald. George was able to do short-hand blueprints and he was also the Sunday school teacher. The church pipe organ was installed in 1915 (with a portion of it funded by the Carnegie Foundation). A seven-foot section of interior, cornice molding fell off and crashed through some front seating and the floor and landed in the basement in 1937. It was rediscovered years later in George MacDonald’s barn.
The 1½-storey building had a modified, cruciform plan with an apse, narthex, and square and polygonal entrance towers. There was a steeply-pitched, gable roof with pyramidal and polygonal roofs on the towers. This structure was a complex massing of heavy, simple forms, each of which had a clear function. The main entrance was through a large, round-arched doorway with a crescent-shaped transom light and a heavy, panelled, wood door. It was set into a high, square tower at the southeast corner of the church and it marked the site as a landmark within the town. Tall, narrow, window openings had thin windows with a vertical emphasis. Some secondary windows were set in rectangular openings (but with the same narrow proportions). Windows having round-arched openings of various sizes in groups, and as singles, lit the nave. The simplicity of this church and the lack of typical Romanesque Revival details such as heavy, stone stringcourses and lintels gave the church a Norman feel with its squared tower and massive walls. Square pinnacles topped the four corners of the entrance tower. The building had masonry construction with brick cladding and a cut-stone foundation. Len Saint, a local stone mason and brick layer, did the plastering for the church. There were metal panels on the steeple and tower roofs. According to the 2000 inventory, the church was in excellent condition with many original features.
The congregation moved to St. John’s Presbyterian Church which was located on the Middleton Sideroad (circa 2004). Trinity Anglican Church purchased the old Presbyterian Church building and land in 2004 and the building was demolished in 2005 to provide additional parking for the congregation of Trinity Anglican Church. (1, 3, 4, Trinity Anglican Church Bradford website)

George Jackson

A Heritage Moment - Trinity Anglican Church, Bond Head

Description : On the north side of the 7th Line, about 1 km. west of Bond Head, there is a metre-high cairn in the fence line, that marks the location of the home and church built by the Rev. Featherstone Osler in the late 1830s. The frame church, that would become Trinity Anglican Church in Bond Head, was initially planned a lecture base for divinity students, church school, and centre for baptisms and marriages. It was during this time, that four sons were born to the Oslers - Feathersone, Britton, Edmund and William. The two elder sons became lawyers of note, Edmund a banker, and William, a doctor who was knighted for his service to his fellow man, and whose work changed the nature of medical practice and diagnosis. A number of medical facilities in Ontario have been named in honour of Sir William Osler, and at Trinity Anglican Church today, a memorial window and brass plaque are of great interest to the members of the medical profession who come from all over the world to visit the birthplace of this leader of their chosen profession. The Osler timber-frame country church, with its stucco coating, was moved in September of 1885 from the 7th Line to the top of the hill, at the northwest corner of Bond Head. It was rollered down the rural road in sections, reassembled, then given a veneer of brick and a new steeple. New oak pews were installed, and the interior was trimmed in oak. Much of the original interior and exterior still survive, including items used by Rev. Osler himself. On December 20th, 1885, Rev. Osler travelled from his Dundas charge to officially open the renovated church in its new location. Recently, Dr. Watters, a local resident and retired surgeon, speaking to the Bradford West Gwillimbury Local History Association, stated, "The old Osler church built and preached in by the Reverend Featherstone Osler, home to his astonishing family, is a piece of Canadian history of interest around the world. We must find some way to preserve the Osler church as part of that character, and as a reminder of the kind of people who began it."

Bradford West Gwillimbury Times

Anglican Church - Holland Landing

A sketch of the Holland Landing Anglican Church as it appeared in the Holland Landing Scope. The caption read: "The Holland Landing Anglican Church is a landmark in that community, as represented here in a sketch by Simon Limbert. The community was officially named in 1821 when the first post office was established. The church was constructed in 1850 from materials taken from an older building.

Armstrong, Mrs. James (Jane) obituary

Event Date : Friday, November 11, 1966
Event Type : Death

Description : Although not enjoying the best of health for some time, the last illness of Mrs. James Armstrong, of 98 John Street E., Bradford, was not lengthy, when she passed away in York County Hospital on Friday, November 11. Mrs. Armstrong was a life-long resident of Bradford, where she received her schooling as the former Violet Jane Saint. With her marriage to the late James Armstrong she continued to reside in Bradford, where she enjoyed life with the company of her relatives and long-time friends.Her church was Trinity Anglican, Bradford. Mrs. Armstrong's husband predeceased her in 1956 and she is survived by one daughter (Shirley), Mrs. William Watson of Bradford and her grandchildren. One sister, Mrs. Sara Reeves of Bradford, and a brother, Mr. Leonard Saint of Bradford also survive. The funeral was held on November 14 from the Lewis Funeral Home, with her rector, Rev. W. H. Warnica, conducting the services. Interment was in Mount Pleasant Cemetery.The pallbearers were Messrs. James Church, Gordon Church, Jack Church, Allen Hodgson, Mel. Saint and Roy Saint.

Bradford Witness

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