Holland Marsh

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Holland Marsh

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Holland Marsh

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Holland Marsh

290 Archival description results for Holland Marsh

243 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

1934 Brought First Settlement to Holland Marsh

"The first year-round residents of the Marsh arrived in the late autumn of 1934 and took up residence in the row of houses shown in the above picture. They were families from Holland and they named their village Ansnorveld.
Members of the Christian Reformed Church, after selling their first crops, built the first church on the Marsh, also shown above, in the spring of 1936. Today there are two beautiful Christian Reformed churches on the Holland Marsh."

Bradford Witness

Accidental Deaths

Contains articles on the accidental deaths within the Bradford and West Gwillimbury area

Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library

Agriculture

Contains items relating to Agricultural history in Bradford West Gwillimbury. Headings include: 1861 Ag. Report on Census Agricultural Articles and Advertisements Ontario Farmer Articles Market & Price Information Farm Innovation Dairy Farm Names/Information Fences Agriculture - Other

WEGWHIST Collection

Andy, 71, remembers 45 harvest years on Holland Marsh

"Andy Simurda, 71, rises each summer morning at dawn to help his son, John, cultivate vegetables on the family's holding in the Holland Marsh. In 1932, Mr. Simurda came to the marsh with three friends from his native country, Czechoslovakia. J. Kacmar, Joseph Kuhla, and M. Sklencar were partners with Mr. Simurda in marsh gardening. They even shared accommodation in the village of Bradford while their wives waited in Czechoslovakia until the men established themselves in Canada."

Shirley Zima

Art Janse, Father of the Holland Marsh

"Professor W.H. Day is the original father of the Holland Marsh but for the past 36 years, that role has fallen to Art Janse. On April 30th, Janse retired from his role and it is now up to the new Holland Marsh Governance body to make the new Marsh relocation scheme a reality..."
Article continues on to highlight Art Janse's contributions to the marsh, and upcoming projects and renovations.

Attendance is Representative at Unveiling of Cairn

Attendance is Representative at Unveiling of Cairn

The unveiling of the Professor W.H. Day memorial cairn, with bronze plaque, which was erected by the combined efforts of the Tourist and Industrial Committee of Simcoe County Council and the municipalities of Bradford, West Gwillimbury Township and King Township, at Bradford town hall on Sunday afternoon in recognition of the valued service given to this district by the late professor in the reclamation of the Holland Marsh, attracted a very representative assemblage. The Province of Ontario was represented by the M.P.P. for Simcoe Centre, George G. Johnston, who was accompanied by his wife. The Ontario Agricultural College was represented by its president, Dr. J.D. MacLachlan, and several members of its staff. The Ontario Archaeological and Historical Sites Advisory Committee had representation in Wm. Cranston, editor of the Midland Free Press, who is also secretary of the County Tourist and Industrial Committee. The counties of Simcoe and York were represented by their wardens, and in Simcoe, by many members of the county council. The county Tourist and Industrial Committee had present practically its entire personnel. The townships of West Gwillimbury and King, and the town of Bradford were represented by their reeves and councils as well as by many residents from these municipalities.

The members of the late Professor Day's family were present with the exception of Stella (Mrs. Caughey) who resides in St. Andrews, N.B., but she was represented by her son, Michael, a student at the University of New Brunswick, presently employed in the civil service at Ottawa for the summer months. Attending were the two sons, William and Harry with their wives and families and the other daughter, Ida (Mrs. Ray Smith) with her husband and family.

Reeve D. Arthur Evans of Bradford was chairman for the program, welcoming the visitors and expressing appreciation to those who had given assistance to the project and to the arrangements for the unveiling day, naming particularly Mr. Louis A. Neilly who designed the cairn. Rev. F.G. MacTavish of Bradford United Church led in prayer and speakers on the program included Reeve Lawson Robinson of Elmvale, Chairman of the Tourist and Industrial Committee for Simcoe County; Reeve Percy Selby of West Gwillimbury and William Hodgson of King Township; Wardens John Small of Simcoe County and M. McMeachie of York County; Charles Davis of the Holland Marsh; Wm. Cranston of the Tourist and Industrial Committee and member of the Ontario Archaeological and Historical Sites Advisory Committee; George G. Johnson, M.P.P., Simcoe Centre; Dr. J.D. MacLachlan, President of the O.A.C. and Professor R.C. Moffat of the O.A.C. and former colleague of the late Professor Day. The latter two gentlemen were introduced by Glen Henderson, a graduate of the college. Immediately following the unveiling ceremony by William N. Day, elder son of the late Professor Day, C.T.S. Evans, Q.C., whose father, the late T.W.W. Evans, Q.C., as municipal solicitor, played a prominent role at the time of the reclamation of the marsh, spoke briefly and read a letter from Rev. Harold W. Vaughan, Th.D., D.D. now of Brantford, who was minister of the United Church here previous to and at the time of Professor Day's death. Quoting that letter:
"It is a splendid thing which the people of this County of Simcoe and the Townships of West Gwillimbury, King and the Village of Bradford, undertake to do this day. For over three years it was my privilege to know Professor Day and to see the determination with which he pursued a great vision - a vision which took him out of the Agricultural College, away from the cleanliness and order of classroom instruction into the muck and toil of labour on the Marsh. However, he knew it could be done. He was certain that the Marsh could be drained, irrigation ditches strategically placed, and eventually a battle of moisture control won and productive vegetable land created on a large scale.

Unfortunately, Professor Day was not spared to see the fulfillment of his vision, although even at that date, enough of its promise was there for him to know that he had been right.

The problem of marketing of the attendant economy, of the finalizing of chemical research in fertilizers, and above all, the detail of storing and packaging, still had to be conquered. I well remember the time that Professor Day died of a heart attack while working in the Marsh itself. It seemed, in a way, pathetic and yet there was also something of majestic triumph in the manner of his death, for he died working at the task to which he had given himself unstintingly across the years, and today the people of all this area know a new prosperity and opportunity because of the vision and perseverance of this fine man.

Thus, to honour his memory is not only to pay tribute to the past and to the vision of one who was more largely responsible than any other for the present result, but it is also to commit yourselves as citizens of these areas to a continued interest in this project and to its consistent growth for the welfare not only of the people here but of consumers throughout the whole land."

Bradford Witness

Attention / Tractor Rehabilitation

Two articles on health and safety of residents affected by the Hurricane Hazel flood. The crops are considered condemned because of their submersion, and advice on fixing your own submerged tractor.

Bradford Witness

Author of Marsh Study dead

"Dr. John R. Brown, a professor at the University of Toronto who studied the effects of pesticides on workers in the Holland Marsh, died Saturday at the age of 57. In April this year Dr. Brown warned than an important (missing part of the article). Dr. Brown qualified as a medical doctor in London, England, in 1953. He received a PhD in applied physiology. After coming to Canada in 1959 he lectured at the University of Toronto in science, environmental health, and industrial health. Dr. Brown was blind in one eye since childhood and became almost totally blind in 1969, but he continued to work with the help of his wife, Helena, and son, David Bartholomew. He was the author of four technical books, president of the Health League of Canada, and chairman of the national committee of employment for the Canadian National Institute for the Blind."

Bradford Witness

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