Schools

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37 Queen Street - The Thompson Fisher House

The Thompson Fisher House is located at 37 Queen St. (on the northeast corner of Queen and Rebecca Streets). It was built around 1880 in the Eclectic Neoclassical style. It belonged to J.C. Wood in the 1950’s. He was the principal at the original, adjacent Bradford High School.
The two-storey, rectangular building has a symmetrical façade and a centre hall plan (Neoclassical features). A medium-pitched, hip roof with a wide overhang and a full-width, awning roof at the porch are Regency Revival features. The house has large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights. Ground-floor windows and the entrance door have transom lights. The arched shutters may be original. Decorative details at the porch columns, a busy verge board, and paired, soffit brackets (over new metal soffits) appear to be twentieth-century additions. The house has solid brick construction as well as the original wood banister, doors, and 12” baseboards. According to the 2000 inventory, the decorative trim is excessive and without precedent in the community. It also notes that while some degree of eclecticism is not out of place, the total effect on this well-maintained building is unconvincing. (1, 3, 5)

George Jackson

75 Queen Street - Fred C. Cook Senior Public School

The Fred C. Cook Senior Elementary School is located at 75 Queen Street. It is not the original building to be found on this site. That structure was a small, two-room, grammar school from Bond Head that was loaded onto a sled and pulled by horses many years ago to the newly-formed town of Bradford. It was set among the pine trees found on a plot of land between Fletcher and Queen Streets. That structure eventually became the first high school in Bradford. It was destroyed by fire in 1890 and a new school was opened on the same site. It burned as well. The Fred C. Cook Senior Elementary School (as seen in the photo) was erected in its place in 1923 or 1924. It was built in the Colonial Revival style. A four-room wing was built in the rear school yard in 1956 (1960’s?) to alleviate over-crowding.
The main building has 2½ storeys. Its large, simple, rectangular form dominates this site. The structure is set well back from the street on a broad expanse of lawn. This positioning suggests its importance in the community. There are large window openings with high floor to ceiling heights, and a flat roof (probably covered with built-up tar and gravel). The entrance is raised one-half storey above grade level. Stairs lead directly to an over-scaled entrance door framed by white-painted pilasters and a plain, wood entablature above. The double door and transom do not appear to be original. The tall, ‘Venetian” windows (characteristic of the neoclassical style) have pilasters and three-foot ‘lights’. The first and second-storey windows are joined by recessed, wood panels. A white-painted, urn-trimmed, roof balustrade is set into a brick, parapet wall. Thin pilaster strips (set into a continuous ‘sill’ at the ground-floor level) sub-divide the front façade into multiple bays. The building has concrete, masonry construction with brick, masonry cladding, applied wood details, and a concrete foundation. According to the 2000 inventory, the building is in excellent condition with many original details.
A new, modern version of the Fred C. Cook Elementary School opened in September, 2013. It is located at 20 Fletcher Street. (1, 3, Bradford District High School’s web site)

George Jackson

A new name for the new school

On May 13th, parents and other members of the school communities of Fred C. Cook, W.H. Day and Sir William Osler Public Schools met to consider the names suggested for the new Bradford elementary school on Professor Day Drive. Following the protocol established by the Simcoe County District School Board, parents and students at the three "feeder" schools were invited to submit names for consideration. Among the suggestions: Susan Cassidy, the first teacher in Bradford; Charles Evans,; Jean Kell; Gordon Compton; Dr. Blackwell; and Kristin Coombes. Not all the suggestions were people: some were descriptive, like Trillium, Fieldcrest, Hillside and Windy Hill. On May 21st, a special committee consisting of a parent representative from each school council, a member of the Town Council, Superintendent Stan Wells, Trustee Bob Evans, and new Principal Marlane Brooks, will meet to select 3 names, to be recommended to the School Board - which will make the final decision, possibly on June 16th. Brooks emphasized the importance of the name selection process, noting, "It's a new beginning."

Bradford West Gwillimbury Times

A Sesquicentennial Party!

"On May 27th, 1857, the Town of Bradford was incorporated. Next Sunday, May 27th, Bradford will launch a year of Sesquicentennial celebrations, with a Re-enactment, Proclamation and Sesquicentennial Flag-raising, 3 p.m. outside the Bradford West Gwillimbury Council Chambers on Holland St. East.
There will be a proclamation by the Mayor, greetings from the County, Province and Federal government - and a brief (and humorous) re-enactment of the incorporation, by the award-winning Bradford District High School Drama Club.
Then watch as the flag is raised, and enjoy a slice of Sesquicentennial cake.
Organizers are looking for participants for a Sesquicentennial Parade to take place at 3 p.m. on August 19th, following the same route as the Santa Claus Parade. The theme: 'Bradford Through the Ages'.
Anyone with antique farm equipment, classic or antique cars; representatives of Minor League sports, and hockey alumni of Bradford's historic teams (The Blues, Vasey Jrs., etc); choirs and bands - in fact, any community group, business or organization is invited to participate in this historic event.
The Town is looking for nominations for Parade Marshal; residents can nominate anyone for the honorary position. There will also be a contest for Junior Marshal."

Bradford West Gwillimbury Times

Accident - George Stoddart

"Yesterday afternoon Mr. Geo. Stoddart met with a serious accident. He was working on the new school building at Middleton, and the scaffold on which he was standing at the time gave way precipitating him, and Mr. Fred McKay, to the ground a distance of about 25 feet. Mr. McKay escaped unhurt, while Mr. Stoddart sustained a broken leg at the ankle. The nature of the break is considered to be quite serious, and may mean amputation of the right foot."

Bradford Witness

Ansnorveld Public School

This is the opening of Ansnorveld Public School in September of 1935. The first teacher was Miss. Aileen Nolan. In 1957 Mr. Dan Blake of Bradford was the main instructor.

Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library

Bemrose, James

The article accompanying this photograph gives a quick history of Bemrose Co. General Store, owned by the Bemrose brothers John and James. Their father, John, was a contractor and was well known in the town, a reputation which was passed down to the brothers. This store in the photograph was run by James Bemrose alone after his return to Bradford in 1901 in the former store of J.S. Boddy, and was in the same block as the Edmanson businesses on Holland Street (near 71 Holland St. East).
James Bemrose was a member of the Masonic Order. This photograph was taken because he was part of Bradford's Model School Board, along with other board members.

Bond Head

Contains photographs, paintings/pictures, maps, etc. relating to Bond Head

Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library

Bond Head Public School Class Photo 1896

Bond Head Public School. Teacher was Miss Taylor. Back of photo reads, "Mrs. Kathleen Watt, 1580 Bathurst St. Apt. 23, Toronto." Kathleen Smith Watt is in the back row. Annie Smith Tomlin is the fifth person from the left in the second row.

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