Veterans

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61 Archival description results for Veterans

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A Soldier's journey back in time and place

Article on the service of World War I veteran, William J. Weyman, from his perspective in the 9th Scottish Highland Artillery Division, 50th Brigade. This edition of Bradford Today featured many aspects of the Bradford Remembrance Day Ceremony in 1991.

Bradford West Gwillimbury Today

Adams' children

These are the children of Charles and Emily (Johnson) Adams, farmers of Bradford. David and John in the back row, and their sisters Bertha, Lilly (Perry) and Emily (Else). Jessie Lawrence is not pictured as she lived in Saskatchewan. David and John fought in World War I, though John died in Belgium on November 10th, 1917 and is buried in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.

Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library

Bond Head Cenotaph plaque - WWI

Photograph of the Bond Head Cenotaph plaque - memorial to the soldiers who lost their lives in the Great War from Bond Head. Plaque reads:
"In Memoriam
Sgt. James Edward Cassells.
Robert Everett Carter.
Leonard Averill.
William J.M. Wood.
Who fell in the Great War."

Peter Wilson

Bond Head Cenotaph Plaque - WWII

Bond Head Memorial Plaque for Soldiers who lost their lives in World War II from the Bond Head area. Plaque reads:
"In Memoriam
Harold Wilson
Laurie Melbourne
Ross Rutherford
Walter Aelick
Walter Andrews
Earl Slack
Robson Jewitt
Who lost their lives in the Second World War."

Peter Wilson

Celebrating Canada's Veterans in Bradford!

A newspaper article about celebrating Canadian veterans in Bradford West Gwillimbury.

"National Homes hosted this community event at the Bradford Public Library, November 7th in honour of Canada's veterans. National Homes has named the streets in their community of The Forest after WWI and WWII veterans and unveiled the names at this event..."

Snapd Bradford

Collis, John Albert

Photograph of John A. Collis, soldier from World War II. John was born on October 14th, 1915 in Lowville, Ontario to parents George and Florence May Collis. He later married Dorothy Ruby in Bradford, Ontario and had a daughter, Joan Yvonne Collis, and a son, John Neill Collis. He was killed in action on July 25th, 1944 in Caen, France, and is buried in the Bretteville-Sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery in Calvados, France.

Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library

Coutts, Richard (Dick) obituary

Event Date : Saturday, January 09, 1971
Event Type : Death

Description : Died at Stevenson Memorial Hospital, Alliston. War veteran and one of the older residents of Cookstown.(Cookstown News)

Bradford Witness

D-Day remembered...

"It has been described as the largest invasionary force ever amassed.
On June 6th, 1944, ships "covered the sea" in the staging area between the Isle of Wight and Normandy, preparing to carry 150,000 American, Canadian and British troops to five key beachheads in France.
As the troops prepared for invasion, 11,000 planes began their bombing runs shortly after midnight, dropping nearly 1,800 tons of bombs on German positions. Paratroops, including the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, were dropped behind enemy lines, and 500 battleships moved into position to shell the Normandy coastline.
The Allied invasion of Europe, dubbed Operation Overlord, was originally scheduled for June 5th, but delayed by stormy weather. When meteorological reports suggested a break in the weather on the 6th, the invasion was ordered to go ahead - through seas so rough that most soldiers were seasick on the passage across the Channel.
The assault began at 6:30 a.a., on the beaches code-named Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword. The 15,000 to 20,000 troops of the 3rd Canadian Division concentrated on Juno, and the villages of Vaux, Graye-sur-Mer, Courseulles-sur-Mer, Beiniere-sur-Mer, and St. Aubin-sur-Mer,
Shortly after 8 a.m., the Canadian forces hit the beaches. Some battalions met little resistance, finding that the way had been cleared by the earlier bombardment; others discovered that the enemy positions were still intact, and faced heavy fire.
Among the first to land were the Royal Canadian Engineers, called on to blast through the concrete seawalls and barbed wire that blocked the coast, clear minefields, and prepare roads for advancing forces; and the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps. Many of the Medics were killed while trying to assist wounded soldiers in that first assault.
By the end of the first day of fighting, 4,000 allied troops had been killed, 342 of them Canadians. But the beacheheads had been established, and the Canadians had penetrated as far as 11 km inland.
It was the beginning of the end for the Nazi war machine. Eleven months later, on May 7th, 1945, Germany surrendered.
"War is nothing but death, disease, destruction, disablement...and a terrible waste." - D-Day veteran."

Bradford Witness

Dimock, Hedley Gilbert

Photograph of Flight Sergeant Hedley G. Dimock of the RCAF, who died June 26, 1944 in a take-off accident in India.

Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library

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