Bradford West Gwillimbury Public Library Archives

With Our Men in Uniform

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With Our Men in Uniform

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With Our Men in Uniform

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With Our Men in Uniform

5 Results for With Our Men in Uniform

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Letter from the Front - Bruno Cavallo

  • CA BWGPL LHC-Her-WWII-2016-11-08-09
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  • 1943-10-20

"To the Bradford Witness: Have arrived safely overseas. As this is my first trip to this country, I'm looking forward to seeing a great deal of it. I think, in fact, I know that I'll still like good old Canada. I'm writing this letter along with o...

Bradford Witness

Letter from the Front - Harold Wilson

  • LHC-Her-WWII-2016-11-08-04
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  • 1944-06-21

"Dear Mr. McKenzie: I would like to thank you and the members of the bradford Canadian Corps Association for your kindness extended to me while in this country. I wish to thank the Corps for their regular assignment of cigarettes. It is hard to ex...

Letter from the Front - Herb Taylor

  • CA BWGPL LHC-HER-WWII-2016-11-08-02
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  • 1944-06-21

"Dear Friends: Many thanks to you and the people of Bradford for the parcel and cigarettes which I have been receiving regularly. Someone must have given a great deal of thought to the making up of that Christmas parcel. It arrived in fine shape a...

Letter from the Front - Lorne West

  • CA BWGPL LHC-HER-WWII-2016-11-08-03
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  • 1944-06-21

"Dear George: Just a line to let you know I received another 300 cigarettes from the Can. Corps to-day. Many thanks to you and to every member of the Bradford branch. It just occurred to me that I neglected to write last month, so I also thank you...

With Our Men In Uniform - June 21st

  • LHC-Her-WWII-2016-11-08-01
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  • 1944-06-21

"With Our Men in Uniform" was a weekly column where letters or the location of Bradford and West Gwillimbury troops in the Second World War was disclosed to the town. It was a way to give updates on their conditions, or let the soldiers themselves...